The LIVE CHAT thread

Joined
Mar 30, 2017
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C'mon we can't start arguing....there's only four of us.

Let's all keep nice and calm before this thread transforms into the new reddit.
You'd have to fill me when it comes to reddit. I used to have an account with it, but haven't been on it for about a year. Also, I'm not too keen on arguing online, or in person for that matter. I'm not usually up for the drama.
 

Awoken2

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Jan 22, 2018
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I think we should dm Tidal.

If he is still alive and out of prison we sure could do with him moderating this highly flammable thread.

What do you think guys?
 

FilthPig

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Jul 28, 2021
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Wildfires... an example of when its TRULY better to have-not than to have!
Wildfires are part of natures cycle and somewhat necessary in small doses.copy-paste
"In environments where hot, fast moving fires are frequent, some pine species have developed very thick, hard cones that are literally glued shut with a strong resin. These “serotinous” cones can hang on a pine tree for years, long after the enclosed seeds mature. Only when a fire sweeps through, melting the resin, do these heat-dependent cones open up, releasing seeds that are then distributed by wind and gravity. "
"As opposed to serotinous cones, which protect enclosed seeds during a fire, the actual seeds of many plants in fire-prone environments need fire, directly or indirectly, to germinate. These plants produce seeds with a tough coating that can lay dormant, awaiting a fire, for several years. Whether it is the intense heat of the fire, exposure to chemicals from smoke or exposure to nutrients in the ground after fire, these seeds depend on fire to break their dormancy. Notable examples of shrubs with this particular fire adaptation include Rhamnaceae (Buckthorn family, including Ceanothus, Coffeeberry, and Redberry) that grow in the California chaparral and other ecosystems of the American West. "
 

FilthPig

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What's your take on large doses?

Nature or psycopaths with lasers?

Just curious.
Cant have an universal answer to that.Would have to take a closer look ,what area is burning,how it got started,who benefits,who loses,is there drought,history of wildfires in that region etc...
If wildfires happen every year they cant get very big - there aint enough broken branches and dry stuff to burn when it happens every year.Years ago i think they banned both cleaning and burning the dry stuff from the forests because it aint environmentally friendly or something .So they let it accumulate and when it burns,it burns big.
 

Awoken2

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Years ago i think they banned both cleaning and burning the dry stuff from the forests because it aint environmentally friendly or something .So they let it accumulate and when it burns,it burns big.
So they banned burning to help the environment which resulted in bigger fires that done even more damage to the environment?

OK got it, struggling to find the logic in it but got it.

Am bailing out of the thread for now as have to be up in 6 hrs for work.

Guys....it's been emotional.
 

TempestOfTempo

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Jan 29, 2018
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7,630
Wildfires are part of natures cycle and somewhat necessary in small doses.copy-paste
"In environments where hot, fast moving fires are frequent, some pine species have developed very thick, hard cones that are literally glued shut with a strong resin. These “serotinous” cones can hang on a pine tree for years, long after the enclosed seeds mature. Only when a fire sweeps through, melting the resin, do these heat-dependent cones open up, releasing seeds that are then distributed by wind and gravity. "
"As opposed to serotinous cones, which protect enclosed seeds during a fire, the actual seeds of many plants in fire-prone environments need fire, directly or indirectly, to germinate. These plants produce seeds with a tough coating that can lay dormant, awaiting a fire, for several years. Whether it is the intense heat of the fire, exposure to chemicals from smoke or exposure to nutrients in the ground after fire, these seeds depend on fire to break their dormancy. Notable examples of shrubs with this particular fire adaptation include Rhamnaceae (Buckthorn family, including Ceanothus, Coffeeberry, and Redberry) that grow in the California chaparral and other ecosystems of the American West. "
I mean man made/related fires.
 
Joined
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So they banned burning to help the environment which resulted in bigger fires that done even more damage to the environment?

OK got it, struggling to find the logic in it but got it.

Am bailing out of the thread for now as have to be up in 6 hrs for work.

Guys....it's been emotional.
It's been real... well, sort of, kind of. :D
 

Awoken2

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Jan 22, 2018
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I think it's a good day to prove you're not a bot.

If you are a real person you can prove it by writing the word "gullible" in response to this message but spell it with just one letter l.

Whilst you're all doing that I'll just get my tumbleweed brush out to clear shit up.....
 

The Zone

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Mar 13, 2017
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Not to make anyone paranoid, but they are taking a look at members. Like Santa, making their lists and checking them twice. Those who come here for entertainment have had their names ripped as well. Back to my hole, I go. This is both cryptic and advice.
 

Frank Badfinger

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Aug 4, 2019
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Not to make anyone paranoid, but they are taking a look at members. Like Santa, making their lists and checking them twice. Those who come here for entertainment have had their names ripped as well. Back to my hole, I go. This is both cryptic and advice.
I have no doubt about that.
 
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