Homesteading/gardening

Maes17

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Chilling with little man while the wife and the oldest are out in the covid world trick or treating.


*sigh*
2020 sucks
 






Maes17

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^^^
Organic bananas though. I’ve been watching videos on banana trees. Back in 2006 bananas were in a shortage


Edit

Maybe it was just Australia but found this interesting while researching how a fruit impacted a business approach
 






polymoog

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My playpen, my rules!
The Doomsday Hall groups poo will go in the river, end of story, and if anybody don't like it they can get on their bikes and go take their chances in the city with Lisa..
i will be forming the Cult of Moog where High Priest Moog teaches his knowledge about soil building and sound permacultural practices. our vegetables and fruits will have a very high brix level. with your ignorant practices, youll be looking like a late 60s biafran in no time.

ti-dull:
Anyway, do plants really NEED any kind of fertiliser?
Look, I once plonked this grass seed on a piece of damp tissue, kept it moist, and within a week it'd sprouted quite happily without any added nutrients. And in the bottom pic notice how its cleverly sent out thin root filaments across the tissue to soak up the water, bless its little cotton socks

do cars really NEED any kind of fuel?
look, i once had a car with no gas and it coasted down a hill. no idea why these crazy people keep buying gas at the gas stations when they can simply put their cars in neutral and roll them down hills everywhere they go.
 






Tidal

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Tidal quote-
My playpen, my rules!
The Doomsday Hall groups poo will go in the river, end of story, and if anybody don't like it they can get on their bikes and go take their chances in the city..:)
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i will be forming the Cult of Moog where High Priest Moog teaches his knowledge about soil building and sound permacultural practices. our vegetables and fruits will have a very high brix level. with your ignorant practices, youll be looking like a late 60s biafran in no time.

Mate, if you don't want to hang with my well organised post-apoc survival group at Doomsday Hall (below)...




...you'll have to take your chances in the gang-infested city (below) and good luck with that..;)

 






polymoog

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Thanks mate but let me modestly hasten to point out that my only real skill lies in the organisational side of things, as I know absolutely zilch about homesteading, farming, cooking, vehicles, first aid, hunting, fishing, guns or women.
So the key to having a good group is to have a balanced range of members who DO know about those things so that we can learn from them.
if your only real skill lies in organizing (i suppose you are inferring that you wish to be in the leadership position), how could you possibly be so obtuse as to refuse the sound advice of experienced gardeners? you are basically proving that you are too stubborn to even consider there are better ways of doing things, ESPECIALLY about things which you have zero experience.

ill form my own group.
 






Tidal

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if your only real skill lies in organizing (i suppose you are inferring that you wish to be in the leadership position), how could you possibly be so obtuse as to refuse the sound advice of experienced gardeners? you are basically proving that you are too stubborn to even consider there are better ways of doing things, ESPECIALLY about things which you have zero experience.
ill form my own group.

As the Tough Leader I'll always listen to advice, but if I don't like it they'll be out on their butts..:)
Tough leader Greg had the same problem in Survivors 1975, bossyboots Abby overuled him and took a sick woman into their Hall even though she might have infected others.
She eventually left because of the friction and Greg was glad to see her go..:)

Greg vs Abby
 






polymoog

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She eventually left because of the friction and Greg was glad to see her go..
no. she eventually left because she had problems with the producer. terry nation left the show for the same reason.
 






Tidal

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The first half of the Survivors 1975 series had an exciting raw 'survival' edge to it and Nation was in his element, but the second half had largely degenerated into a soap as they were all living comfortably in a village, so perhaps Nation didn't want to be a soap scriptwriter and walked.
Also some of those later scripts were not so hot which may have influenced Abby's decision to go, heck even Greg didn't appear in many of the later ones so perhaps he was fed up too.
 






polymoog

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The first half of the Survivors 1975 series had an exciting raw 'survival' edge to it and Nation was in his element, but the second half had largely degenerated into a soap as they were all living comfortably in a village, so perhaps Nation didn't want to be a soap scriptwriter and walked.
Also some of those later scripts were not so hot which may have influenced Abby's decision to go, heck even Greg didn't appear in many of the later ones so perhaps he was fed up too.
i agree. clearly, there were creative differences. i felt the terry nation episodes were far more exciting.
[not to stray off the topic, but you should look into the tripods series.]
 






Tidal

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i agree. clearly, there were creative differences. i felt the terry nation episodes were far more exciting.
[not to stray off the topic, but you should look into the tripods series.]

Thanks, funny thing is I didn't see Tripods on BBC TV in the 1980's, it might have been broadcast at a time when I was away from the box.
I can't find any full episodes on YT, just brief clips and it seems like a copy of the alien things in War of the Worlds.
 






polymoog

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Thanks, funny thing is I didn't see Tripods on BBC TV in the 1980's, it might have been broadcast at a time when I was away from the box.
I can't find any full episodes on YT, just brief clips and it seems like a copy of the alien things in War of the Worlds.
i found the entire episodes on bitchute. matter of fact, i got survivors there as well. the same guy who has it has a good chunk of the long running dr. who series and other terry nation shows.
 






polymoog

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So I’m looking into buying some land with a couple relatives - for us to live on and for them as an escape plan from NYC and possibly retirement/vacations if not needed before then.
back to the original subject: have you made a purchase yet? where are you in your homesteading plan?
 






polymoog

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I'm currently using a cross between those two water droppers

Como fazer o GOTEJADOR MAIS FÁCIL DO MUNDO ~ NUNCA MAIS mate suas plantas - YouTube

Gotejador caseiro de garrafa pet, compartilhe conhecimento - YouTube

I think I used a way too small hole on the bottle, so the water tension was way too strong, so I put a stick on the hole to capillarize the water. it work wonders now
its fine for vegetables and other shallow rooted plants as long as theyre spaced out around the plant. otherwise, the root system will simply congregate around the water bottle and never spread out.


id never use them in your area, especially for fruit trees. they will require deep watering to encourage the root system to seek the water several feet in the ground. water less frequently but saturate the soil completely.

if you have a very hot and dry situation in the summer where you are (brazil?), forget traditional mulching. the mulch will drink up all of the water and nothing will penetrate the soil. its better to go with a thick layer of stone or rocks around the tree.
 






Mr.Anderson

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@polymoog

Thanks for the advice! I'm currently using them for small scale vegetable production, just some lettuce and coriander at first in small jars to keep the earth moist since we get up to 40ºC here and these are more sensitive cultures. For the bigger papaya, acerola-cherry and sugar apple we use regular watering. This reminds me that I should get a thermometer to use near the plants...

Back in 2005 we used drip irrigation in dwarf coconut cultures to a high success, but it was a way more dedicated work and my father used to tend to it with my uncle, i'm completely new to the practical part of plant caring (and as you mentioned, it had bigger spacing between the droplets)
 






polymoog

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@polymoog

Thanks for the advice! I'm currently using them for small scale vegetable production, just some lettuce and coriander at first in small jars to keep the earth moist since we get up to 40ºC here and these are more sensitive cultures. For the bigger papaya, acerola-cherry and sugar apple we use regular watering. This reminds me that I should get a thermometer to use near the plants...

Back in 2005 we used drip irrigation in dwarf coconut cultures to a high success, but it was a way more dedicated work and my father used to tend to it with my uncle, i'm completely new to the practical part of plant caring (and as you mentioned, it had bigger spacing between the droplets)
leafy vegetables are very difficult in the tropics unless you are in the high elevations. 40 degrees will roast them; you might have a chance in the winter. better stick with peppers and small tomatos.
papaya can easily be overwatered and killed. too much or too little is a problem. if you see it get the cercospora leaf spot, you are supposed to chop it half way and let the shoots come up. they are supposed to be free from that virus.
best thing you can do for the acerola cherry is to plant a madre de cacao or pinon (gliricidia sp.) next to it. the nitrogen fixing action of the roots is makes a huge difference, and the tree responds better to a tiny bit of shade.
 






Mr.Anderson

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leafy vegetables are very difficult in the tropics unless you are in the high elevations. 40 degrees will roast them; you might have a chance in the winter. better stick with peppers and small tomatos.
papaya can easily be overwatered and killed. too much or too little is a problem. if you see it get the cercospora leaf spot, you are supposed to chop it half way and let the shoots come up. they are supposed to be free from that virus.
best thing you can do for the acerola cherry is to plant a madre de cacao or pinon (gliricidia sp.) next to it. the nitrogen fixing action of the roots is makes a huge difference, and the tree responds better to a tiny bit of shade.
Yeah, my brother tried to plant onion before but it didn't work very well. My grandpa has managed to grow lettuce very well.

The acerola was already here when we moved in, already beared lots of fruit (around 3 kg in the past few weeks I guess, lots of vitamin C). The problem with it is that it is on my neighboor's property, we just catch the fruit that overgrows my backyard hahaha

There are some other plants growing but none of them are edible, only ornamental. I think i'll stick to the peppers and tomatoes, a friend of mine managed to grow tomatoes before pillbug infestation but he didn't cared too much about it anyway, I really want to grow peppers, but I'll have to organize the backyard better

The papaya is growing big and strong, taller than my father's two story house, and it already has a little simbling!

I'll snap some pictures later to show you how nice they are. The main problem I face is how to recognize if a plant needs some nutrient or another, like magnesium or something. Do you have any book indication? I've seen some guy in alaska doing great with his plants due to a book he managed to read when he was younger
 






polymoog

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I'll snap some pictures later to show you how nice they are. The main problem I face is how to recognize if a plant needs some nutrient or another, like magnesium or something. Do you have any book indication? I've seen some guy in alaska doing great with his plants due to a book he managed to read when he was younger
send the pics.

why not interplant cassava/yucca or have the ground cover of sweet potato? they require no attention.
 






Mr.Anderson

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send the pics.

why not interplant cassava/yucca or have the ground cover of sweet potato? they require no attention.
I used to plant sweet potato in the past! Or was it sugar beet...? So long ago. Things are under lockdown now, in this new house I don't have too much free ground space but when the lockdown relax a little i'm gonna buy some sturdy vases. The models I wanna buy are good enough for a papaya tree to grow, like my father used to do in the past. Speaking which... we still have these vases. Maybe I should borrow them since he don't use them anymore because stray cats tend to eat the plants he tries to growWhatsApp Image 2021-04-21 at 09.31.16.jpegWhatsApp Image 2021-04-21 at 09.31.34.jpeg
The coriander is growing. Still messed up but we will improve
 






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