Great footage of Hong Kong protests

Lisa

Superstar
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
8,048
Likes
3,945
#8
I would think its hard for the people of Hong Kong to go from British rule to the harshness of Chinese rule. If you had had it all your life, that would be different, but they didn’t. I still can remember The Tiananmen Square protests and that man standing down the tank...you don’t mess with the Chinese government.
 





Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
715
Likes
1,072
#9
Yeah, it's tough to tell what's going on not speaking Cantonese. That said mainland Chinese claim the protestors are CIA operatives and people from Hong Kong complain about repression. The truth from watching the live feeds is that most protestors are peaceful young people. The old people ask the police to not hurt the young people. There are some agitators mixed in, but that's everywhere.
 





Lisa

Superstar
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
8,048
Likes
3,945
#10
Yeah, it's tough to tell what's going on not speaking Cantonese. That said mainland Chinese claim the protestors are CIA operatives and people from Hong Kong complain about repression. The truth from watching the live feeds is that most protestors are peaceful young people. The old people ask the police to not hurt the young people. There are some agitators mixed in, but that's everywhere.
Lol! It’s always either US or Israeli operatives stirring up trouble everywhere! Though, the same nations that blame us for everything..still takes our cash! :rolleyes:

Ya, hopefully, it doesn’t end in bloodshed and tears...but I think that from the Tiananmen Square protest..it’s not looking good.
 





Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
715
Likes
1,072
#11
Lol! It’s always either US or Israeli operatives stirring up trouble everywhere! Though, the same nations that blame us for everything..still takes our cash! :rolleyes:

Ya, hopefully, it doesn’t end in bloodshed and tears...but I think that from the Tiananmen Square protest..it’s not looking good.
There might be foreign agitators, but most of it is like Occupy in the early days or the Yellow Vests in France. It seems authentic for the most part.
 





Lisa

Superstar
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
8,048
Likes
3,945
#13
There might be foreign agitators, but most of it is like Occupy in the early days or the Yellow Vests in France. It seems authentic for the most part.
I can’t remember for sure..but when the Chinese took over..didn’t they ease into ruling them because the British asked them to?
 





Lisa

Superstar
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
8,048
Likes
3,945
#15
Ya, China doesn’t do well with autonomy and just want’s to rule the people it rules...must have decided it wasn’t going to wait until 2047 to start controlling Hong Kong. I wonder if people in Hong Kong will even be able to move away now if they want to, or if they are stuck?
 





Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
715
Likes
1,072
#16
Ya, China doesn’t do well with autonomy and just want’s to rule the people it rules...must have decided it wasn’t going to wait until 2047 to start controlling Hong Kong. I wonder if people in Hong Kong will even be able to move away now if they want to, or if they are stuck?
I'm not sure, but at the core they probably don't want any imperialistic forces occupying them.
Tough situation.
 





Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Messages
3,540
Likes
7,146
#17
Yeah, it's tough to tell what's going on not speaking Cantonese. That said mainland Chinese claim the protestors are CIA operatives and people from Hong Kong complain about repression. The truth from watching the live feeds is that most protestors are peaceful young people. The old people ask the police to not hurt the young people. There are some agitators mixed in, but that's everywhere.
I couldn't understand why there were a couple of protestors carrying around American flags, from the images i saw this week. It just seemed strange. I guess this explains it:
US Calls China "Thuggish Regime" For Releasing Identity Of US Official Caught Meeting With HK Protesters
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019...s-china-summons-us-diplomats-over-viral-photo
 





Joined
Jun 17, 2017
Messages
3,540
Likes
5,191
#18
looks like the people have adopted pepe the frog as their symbol of anti-government.
bless the people of hong kong for standing up for themselves.

Pepe The Frog is a symbol of liberty during Hong Kong pro-democracy protests
https://reclaimthenet.org/pepe-the-frog-hong-kong-protests/

from the article:

left-leaning organizations such as the SPLC began to suggest that Pepe The Frog was racist and hateful – with the Anti Defamation League adding Pepe to their list of “Hate symbols” in September of 2016 – much to the amusement of internet users who branded the organization as being out of touch with internet and meme culture.
The adoption of Pepe by Hong Kong pro-democracy and resistance protestors creates a further precedent that Pepe The Frog is mostly perhaps, at its heart, a symbol used to represent liberty, freedom, and anti-establishment movements. And less of the racist symbol that some organizations have tried to paint it as.
 





Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Messages
3,540
Likes
7,146
#19
While i believe that most of the prostestors are genuine in their actions but just as with the April 6th movement(Egypt, Arab Spring), the protest leaders always turn out to be compromised.

Behind a made-for-TV Hong Kong protest narrative, Washington is backing nativism and mob violence

Teenager Vs. Superpower, with help from a bigger superpower

Joshua Wong meets with Sen. Marco Rubio in Washington on May 8, 2017 (Same Rubio backing regime change in Venezuela)

Joshua Wong was just 17 years old when the Umbrella Movement took form in 2014. After emerging in the protest ranks as one of the more charismatic voices, he was steadily groomed as the pro-West camp’s teenage poster child. Wong received lavish praised in Time magazine, Fortune, and Foreign Policy as a “freedom campaigner,” and became the subject of an award-winning Netflix documentary called “Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower.”

Unsurprisingly, these puff pieces have overlooked Wong’s ties to the United States government’s regime-change apparatus. For instance, National Endowment for Democracy’s National Democratic Institute (NDI) maintains a close relationship with Demosistō, the political party Wong founded in 2016 with fellow Umbrella movement alumnus Nathan Law.

In August, a candid photo surfaced of Wong and Law meeting with Julie Eadeh, the political counselor at the U.S. Consulate General in Hong Kong, raising questions about the content of the meeting and setting off a diplomatic showdown between Washington and Beijing.