Goals/Time Management/Optimal Living

Simka

Rookie
Joined
Jul 31, 2018
Messages
97
Wow! How much useful stuff here! I don't know how I missed this thread. When I opened my business and started working remotely, one of the biggest issues was time management. At first, surfing the Internet, working with clients, etc. took so much time that I couldn't understand how experienced business owners manage everything. Fortunately, we live in times of technology and web developers have been working on tools and software that make our lives easier. Thanks to this source https://apix-drive.com/en/blog, I dived into digital transformation, online marketing, tools and service integration. Yes, the process took the time (I guess mostly because I was clueless about many things), but now I can finally successfully combine work and personal life.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Rules for Being Human
1.You will receive a body. You may like it or hate it, but it will be yours the entire period you’re here.
2.You will learn lessons. You are enrolled in a full-time information school called life. Each day you will have the opportunity to learn lessons. You may like the lessons, or think them irrelevant, or stupid, or too hard. It makes no difference. You will learn lessons.
3.There are no mistakes, only lessons. You are made to grow, and growth is a process of trial and error, experimentation. The “pains” of failed experiments are as much a part of the process as the ones that ultimately “work”.
4.A lesson will be repeated until it is learned. The same lesson will be presented to you in various forms until you have learned it. When you have learned it, you can go on with the next lesson.
5.Learning lessons does not end. There is no part of the process of life that does not contain its’ lesson. If you are alive, there are lessons to be learned.
6.“There” is no better than “here”, though the best thing seems to be happening “there”. When you get “there”, it becomes “here”, you will learn for another “there”, that will again, look better than “here”. Always appreciate the “here”.
7.Others are merely mirrors of you. You can not love or hate something about another person unless it reflects to you something you love or hate about yourself.
8.What you make of life is up to you. You have the tools and resources that you need in your mind, heart and body. What you do with them and what attitudes you form is up to you. The choice is “yours”. Nobody “makes” you.
9.The answers to life’s questions lie inside of you. All you need to do is take time to look, listen and understand.
10.In the most essential things in life, you will always get what you asked for. This happens because of your thoughts, choices and attitudes. You may not get what you wanted, but it will be what you asked for.
- Fr. Louis Guntezalman
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Nice :):

"What are the 10 characteristics of a mentally strong person?

Answered by
Mathew P. Vanderburg Updated Jul 23 (via Quora)

What are the 10 characteristics of a mentally strong person?

  1. Don't chase validation from other people. Self-validation is what really matters to them.
  2. Trying to rationalize their problems. They do not allow negative or overwhelming emotions to overshadow their judgment.
  3. View constructive criticism as valuable feedback. An opportunity for growth and personal development.
  4. Don't get irritated by unconstructive criticism (or try not to). Because someone who takes their time just to say something negative to another person is not worth the mental energy and time of emotionally strong people.
  5. Accepting adversity. Emotionally strong people see the difficulties of living as necessary elements of life, leading to a stronger and wiser version of themselves.
  6. Have an optimistic or positive mindset. If your inner world is already gloomy or dark inside, even the sun that shines for you every day will not be able to cheer you up.
  7. Don't let fear paralyze you.
  8. Keep in mind that the errors themselves do not define them.
  9. Focus on finding solutions instead of endlessly crying about your problems and blaming others for them.
  10. Being grateful. Nothing destroys a person inside like always directing his attention to what he lacks while he completely ignores what he has."
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
I have to admit, #6 makes me giggle :D:

Awdhesh Singh
Author: 31 Ways to Happiness | IITian| Director at Awdhesh Academy (2018–present)1y
"What are things intelligent people would never do?
Intelligent people have the following characteristics:

  1. They never follow popular opinion, because most common people are wrong on most of the issues.
  2. They don’t trust everything that is claimed to be true unless they ascertain the truth themselves by their own research and analysis, because they know that what freely comes to them is usually garbage.
  3. They trust their own opinion more than anyone’s else as they form their opinion based on logic and reasoning.
  4. They are lifetime learners since they know that as compared to the total knowledge available in the world, they know only a little.
  5. They learn from every person and every incident of life by reflective prudence and contemplation.
  6. They don’t advise stupid people even when they are asked because they know those stupid people can never appreciate the truth (that is why they are stupid).
  7. They don’t argue with stupid people because they know that they will drag you down to their level and beat them with experience. (Mark Twain)
  8. They are not religious or have faith in any Scripture because most of the knowledge contained in these books are outdated and false. They, however, don’t reject the wisdom contained in these books.
  9. When they are verbally attacked by the stupid people, they never attack them back, but they pray for them like Jesus Christ (“Father, forgive them, for they don't know what they are doing.”)
  10. They are not after money, fame or power, because they know that desire for these things is the root of all unhappiness in the world.
  11. They don’t waste their time chasing what the world considers important. They rather spend their time knowing themselves and do what gives them joy and satisfaction.

Intelligent people would not do anything that goes against these principles."
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
“Anyway”

People are often unreasonable, illogical and self-centered;
Forgive them anyway,

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives:
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some false friends and some true enemies;
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and frank, people may cheat you;
Be honest and frank anyway.

What you spend years building, someone could destroy overnight;
Build anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, others may be jealous;
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, people often forget tomorrow;
Do good anyway.

If you give the world the best you have, it may never be enough;
Give the world the best you have anyway.

You see, in the final analysis, it is between you and God;
It was never between you and the other people anyway.
- Anonymous
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Long but solid read, IMHO:

Feifei Wang
Lives in Seattle, WA (2021–present) Updated 6mo

What is the harsh truth about hard work?

"I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately.
First, I experienced discrimination in the workplace that forced me to reexamine my attitude towards work. Then the entire “quiet quitting” movement. And then the student loan forgiveness “controversy”. I realized something about American Puritan Work Ethics.
On the surface, it seems that a lot of Americans take pride in hard work. You see this all the time, from truck commercials featuring hardworking farmers to billionaire tech CEOs living on their factory floor 24/7, solving problems. And there’s no shortage of personal struggle stories, such as “I worked two jobs to support myself through college” or “I worked 12 hours in the mine to support my family”.
All of that is admirable on the surface. Americans glorify “hard work”.
However, what’s really sinister, is the implication of this glory of hard work. The implication is that “Real” work is supposed to be hard, excruciating, exhausting, and soul-crushing. “Real” work is supposed to leave you empty of energy or joy at the end of the day, dragging your broken body back home with nothing left for yourself and your family.
If it is not hard, it is not “work”.
Think about the rhetoric you heard (often from conservatives) about student loans. The rhetoric often centers around how hard they worked to pay off their student loan. The focus isn’t “I don’t have debts anymore”. The focus is “I work hard, I suffered”. “I’ve worked two jobs, living on instant noodles and chips for four years to pay off my student loan!” The suffering that they went through made their struggles valuable and meaningful.
I heard people telling me, “if I can come to work with a 103-degree fever and put on a smile for my customers, so can you.”
While I’m glad this person took pride in her not missing a single day of work, the truth is, you should not need to come to work with a 103-degree fever. You should have paid sick leave so you can rest. There should not be any pride in giving up your health for your work.
This mentality also allows capital to exploit its workers. Request for better working conditions, reasonable working hours, sufficient breaks, medical benefits with dental and mental care, parental leave, … all of these are reasonable requests. But in the US, somehow, it is being “spoiled” or “lazy”.
When workers work according to the responsibility defined by their positions, they’re “quiet quitting”.
The company expects you to put in extra work because, well, if ain’t soul-crushingly exhausting, it ain’t work.
After all, if your CEO is working 12 hour work day, literally eating and sleeping on the factory floor, how could you leave at 5 pm?
Many companies promote the idea that the company is your family, and your actual family, you know, your spouse and children, are your obligation.
This sentiment is prevalent and perpetuated by various media. Companies would create a more “open” environment, provide snacks, meals, nap rooms, entertainment, gym, and showers… everything for you literally live in the office. Work is still hard, but at least you have free snacks.
And plenty of TV shows, especially those featuring ensemble casts, would create a family-like structure. You have the leaders serve as parents, a bunch of squabbling siblings, and occasionally a weird or wise aunt/uncle. That’s nothing wrong with the found family trope. In fact, it is my favorite literary trope. But these types of TV shows often portray the “work family” as the real family, and character’s actual families often presented as an obstacle the protagonist must overcome so they can focus on work. You rarely see dedicated detectives spending quality time with their families and love it (other than the situation when their family is in danger as a plot device). What you see is their nagging wives, or good-for-nothing children pull them away from their meaningful work, where they save lives.
All of these, together, created an extremely toxic work ethic in the US.
First, the working condition is supposed to be bad. The actual work is supposed to be hard. The workload is supposed to be overwhelming. You’re supposed to go above and beyond. Overtime is the norm. You’re supposed to be exhausted after a day of work, leaving nothing for yourself or your family. Otherwise, it isn’t meaningful or valuable work.
Second, you're supposed to be proud of devoting your life to your work, regardless of the result. The payment or fame is not the point. The actual value of your contribution to society isn’t the point. The point is you work 12 hours a day doing hard work. The hardship and pain you experienced is the only thing that makes life meaningful.
If you’re having fun, you’re not working, therefore should not be paid. Sound familiar? Many artists heard this when negotiating commission fees. “Well, you’re doing what you love, right?”
And of course, there’s the “do what you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life”. So if you’re actually doing what you love, minimum wage that covers your living expanses should be more than enough, right?
Third, your work is your real family. You are at your best, most happy, and most fulfilling when you’re at work.
Lastly, your work defines who you are. Your work is your identity. You’re a doctor, a programmer, a police officer, a bugerflipper, a cashier. You don’t have an identity independent of your work. You are your job. So, keep doing it until you drop dead.
I bought into that. I did. I work in the gaming industry. And as we all know, it is a “passion-driven” industry. People work in this industry because we love games. You have no idea how many panel talks I listened to in GDC talking about how developers crunched for six months, sleeping under their desks, sustained entirely by cold pizza and energy drinks to ship a game. And that’s supposed to be a good thing, a proud thing. And it is supposed to be the norm of the industry.
I had, on more than one occasion, talked about how I see my company as my family when interviewing candidates, or during staff meetings. Now looking back, I was probably the only sap who actually believed it. I know it’s a huge red flag when company leaders talk about such a thing. It’s just kind of sad and pathetic when their workers actually buy into it.
I’m glad I got rid of those blinders on my eyes.
The harsh truth of work?
You’re replaceable to you company, but not to yourself or your family. If you’re gone today, your company will start looking for your backfill tomorrow.
You ain’t the CEO. If you live on the factory floor and work 12 hours a day while ruining your health and ignoring your family, you’re killing yourself, so your CEO can buy Twitter."
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Another great find to share while waiting... :)

"You don't need to be a star to shine.

  1. People who respect themselves in the toughest of days in life, in deepest of failures, miseries, or when no one values them, and continue to respect themselves throughout life earn the respect of people as well. People who can't respect themselves can never earn respect from others. Never rely on your materialistic achievements to respect yourself.
  2. Be there for people when no one trusts them, values them, in their worst days, dark hours. Turnaround when their life becomes better. Don't seek respect, just feel happy.
  3. Be vocal against the wrongs, judgement, abuse, misuse of authority, have the guts to speak for people, to stand tall alone.
  4. Lead by example, be the first one to take and follow a change or a big step, be determined and relentless, set example for others, don't hide behind your subordinate. Lead from the front.
  5. Never be high on your opinions, never reject people’s thoughts outrightly, never stereotype or judge people, stay neutral and give people opportunity to present themselves and then judge them.
  6. Stand by the right even if you have to stand against your loved ones or friends. Challenge the authority if you have to, follow the path of truth, it has consequences and pain in the short run, but people respect you in the long run.
  7. You should genuinely aim at helping people, to take botheration for others, and not be self-centred. Share your success and stand by yourself in failures. No expectation in return is the key here, and the other important point is never ever show off your help to others.
  8. A person of values, high standard of thinking, honesty, good character, no lose words, no comprising on values even in emergency. Stronger below the belt.
  9. Respecting people in general, rich, poor, famous, ordinary, needy, relatives, strangers, doesn't matter at all, just a respect life, respect each soul as a part of your soul.
  10. A person who is not lazy or inactive, wants to act, doesn't find excuses, doesn't stop by distractions, is always dedicated to the best of his deeds. He is a performer, a fighter, unstoppable.
  11. Create your boundary, be a little distant from people, don't share all your secrets, don't show guilt for the smallest of errors, don't rely too much on people, be strong, be your own support throughout life.
  12. No matter whatever you do in life, in terms of your career, especially, the vision should be the betterment of people in general, you aim to bring a positive change in people’s lives, you aim at creating smiling faces.
Anubhav Jain"
 
Joined
Jul 13, 2023
Messages
3
Time management for Student 2023

Time management is essential for students to effectively balance their academic responsibilities, extracurricular activities, and personal life. Here are some tips for effective time management:
  1. Prioritize tasks: Identify your most important tasks and prioritize them based on deadlines and importance. This helps you focus on what needs to be done first.
  2. Create a schedule: Develop a daily or weekly schedule that allocates specific time blocks for studying, attending classes, completing assignments, and other activities. Stick to the schedule as much as possible to maintain consistency.
  3. Break tasks into smaller steps: Large projects or assignments can be overwhelming. Break them down into smaller, manageable tasks, and tackle them one at a time. This approach helps prevent procrastination and allows for better progress tracking.
  4. Avoid multitasking: While it may seem efficient, multitasking often leads to decreased productivity and reduced focus. Instead, focus on one task at a time and give it your full attention.
  5. Eliminate distractions: Minimize distractions such as social media, unnecessary notifications, or noisy environments while studying. Find a quiet, dedicated space where you can concentrate and stay focused.
  6. Take regular breaks: Breaks are essential for maintaining productivity and preventing burnout. Incorporate short breaks into your study sessions to recharge and rejuvenate your mind.
  7. Use technology tools: ChatGPT can assist you in various academic tasks. You can use it to brainstorm ideas, get help with difficult concepts, proofread your writing, or seek explanations for complex topics. It can also provide you with study resources, practice questions, and helpful tips in various subjects.
  8. Set realistic goals: Set specific, attainable goals for each study session or task. This provides a sense of direction and achievement, boosting motivation and productivity.
  9. Learn to say no: While it's important to engage in extracurricular activities and socialize, it's equally important to know your limits and prioritize your academic commitments. Learn to say no to excessive commitments that might interfere with your studies.
Remember, effective time management is a skill that takes time to develop. It's essential to find a routine that works best for you and adapt it as needed. Regularly evaluating and adjusting your time management strategies will help you stay organized and succeed academically.
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
I'm passing this along to my clients! I don't know if they'll understand and/or adhere to it, but at least I tried:


How can one practically change themselves to be better?
Mukul Royy
Ex-army officer, Physician critical care 3y

  1. "When you’re no longer friends with someone respect the secrets they shared with you.
  2. Maturity is understanding that someone may be online but not for you.
  3. Texting is a brilliant way to miscommunicate how you feel, & misinterpret what other people mean.
  4. There’re two categories of people. One, who do their job & the other who judge category one. Be category one.
  5. If you become attached to what eases your pain, then you’re just exchanging your cage.
  6. Life is more beautiful than we can imagine. But you must be brave enough to upgrade your opinion of yourself in order to experience this.
  7. Forgiveness is an insight job, & this job starts within.
  8. If you really want to change & be smarter, be more curious. It’ll drive you towards more knowledge & wisdom.
  9. Offer void to people who don’t reciprocate your good vibes.
  10. Unfairness might be profitable in short term, but in the long term it sucks.
  11. If this time in your life is difficult, stay strong. It’s not without meaning.
  12. Feeling uncertain & lost is part of our journey. Don’t avoid it. Everything is working for your highest purpose.
  13. Be nice & smile at everyone you meet. You don’t know what they might be going though & they may need that smile.
  14. As long as you don’t die, you still have time to make a wrong right.
  15. Just Chill!!"
 

DesertRose

Superstar
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
7,561
How can one practically change themselves to be better?
Somehow I did not see this post! Thanks OM! Loved the advice!
I'm passing this along to my clients! I don't know if they'll understand and/or adhere to it, but at least I tried:


How can one practically change themselves to be better?
Mukul Royy
Ex-army officer, Physician critical care 3y

  1. "When you’re no longer friends with someone respect the secrets they shared with you.
  2. Maturity is understanding that someone may be online but not for you.
  3. Texting is a brilliant way to miscommunicate how you feel, & misinterpret what other people mean.
  4. There’re two categories of people. One, who do their job & the other who judge category one. Be category one.
  5. If you become attached to what eases your pain, then you’re just exchanging your cage.
  6. Life is more beautiful than we can imagine. But you must be brave enough to upgrade your opinion of yourself in order to experience this.
  7. Forgiveness is an insight job, & this job starts within.
  8. If you really want to change & be smarter, be more curious. It’ll drive you towards more knowledge & wisdom.
  9. Offer void to people who don’t reciprocate your good vibes.
  10. Unfairness might be profitable in short term, but in the long term it sucks.
  11. If this time in your life is difficult, stay strong. It’s not without meaning.
  12. Feeling uncertain & lost is part of our journey. Don’t avoid it. Everything is working for your highest purpose.
  13. Be nice & smile at everyone you meet. You don’t know what they might be going though & they may need that smile.
  14. As long as you don’t die, you still have time to make a wrong right.
  15. Just Chill!!"
 

DesertRose

Superstar
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
7,561
BECOME THE BEST YOU CAN BE - Motivational Speech


GRIND IN SILENCE, SHOCK THEM WITH YOUR SUCCESS - Motivational Speech


"Not everyone needs to understand your true motives
Not everyone needs to understand your purpose.
Not everyone needs to understand your mission,
But the truth is it is about passion, it is about discipline,
it is about awareness,
it is about accountability!
You have to be accountable for your actions,
but are you prepared to grind it out?"
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Something worth noting:

Jerry Tan
Senior Staff Accountant at Rule One Proteins (2016–present)


"What subtle behaviour is an indicator that someone is not a nice person?
  1. Lack of empathy: People who lack empathy may show little concern for others' feelings, experiences, or well-being. They may come across as cold or indifferent to the needs and emotions of others.
  2. Frequent criticism: Someone who is not a nice person may be quick to criticize others, even over small or insignificant things. They may belittle or demean others in order to feel superior.
  3. Disrespectful behaviour: This could include interrupting others, disregarding boundaries, or speaking rudely or condescendingly to others. They may also ignore or dismiss others' opinions or perspectives.
  4. Self-centeredness: People who are not nice may focus primarily on their own needs and desires, often at the expense of others. They may be unwilling to compromise or consider others' needs.
  5. Dishonesty: People who are not nice may lie or manipulate others in order to get what they want. They may also be deceptive or secretive about their intentions or actions."
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Great article:

"The Decline of Excellence in The Age of “Nice”
A word for leaders in today's socially conscious world...
By Phil Cooke
Sophie Rebecca is a 6ft 3 trans woman who has decided to become a female ballerina. Long shot, right? He looks to be a pretty substantial guy physically, but he was actually accepted to the prestigious Royal Academy of Dance in 2017. Thousands of very talented biological women apply for the academy every year, and, well, Sophie got it. You can take a look here and see if you can tell which dancer is Sophie:


I’m not being critical of poor Sophie, but when it comes to men who become women and start competing against biological women and obsessive diversity initiatives that push unqualified people based on ethnicity, gender, or whatever, it just seems like all this being nice and respectful has come with a price.

The pursuit of excellence often involves pushing boundaries, demanding high standards, and offering candid feedback – regardless of how the team “feels” about it. However, in today’s increasingly interconnected, socially conscious, and “woke” world, there’s a growing inclination to prioritize being ‘nice’ or avoiding conflict over achieving and maintaining high standards of excellence. In my opinion, this shift has led to a decline in the unyielding pursuit of excellence, often at the cost of progress and quality. For instance:

The Fear of Offending: In a culture that values being politically correct and avoiding offense, there’s a hesitancy to give critical feedback or point out flaws. Constructive criticism or holding individuals to high standards might be perceived as harsh or confrontational, leading to a reluctance to push for excellence.

Mediocrity in the Name of Kindness: The desire to be ‘nice’ often translates to accepting mediocrity rather than demanding excellence. Settling for average or ‘good enough’ becomes the norm to avoid potentially hurting someone’s feelings or causing discomfort.

Embracing the Average: The fear of being labeled as ‘mean’ or ‘unpleasant’ often leads to a culture that rewards mediocrity. Embracing and celebrating average performance over striving for excellence sets a standard that’s lower than what is truly achievable.

Diminished Innovation and Creativity: The pursuit of excellence often involves risk-taking and experimentation. When criticism or pushing boundaries is discouraged, it stifles innovation and hampers creativity. People might shy away from bold ideas or unconventional approaches for fear of facing disapproval or conflict.

The Erosion of Standards: When high standards are replaced by an emphasis on being ‘nice,’ it leads to a gradual erosion of benchmarks and expectations. This can impact industries, education, and various sectors where maintaining high standards is crucial for progress and success.

Short-Term Comfort Over Long-Term Growth: Avoiding conflict or critique in favor of being ‘nice’ might provide short-term comfort, but it can impede long-term growth and improvement. In the absence of honest feedback and stringent standards, individuals, businesses, and society as a whole might struggle to reach their full potential.

For leaders, the decline of demanding excellence due to the fear of not being ‘nice’ poses a significant challenge in every area of life. Certainly, every qualified person needs an opportunity to succeed regardless of who they are, and I’ve written before about how diversity is an incredibly positive thing – particularly with creative teams. But that diversity can’t come at the expense of excellence.

Because when we stop inspiring excellence in our team, we’re undermining everyone’s potential."

(source)
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
3,524
Saving this for my clients! :)

What are the some sign of maturity?
Answered by Qasim Ali


"SIGNS OF MATURITY:
1, Small talks don't excite you anymore.
2, Sleep is more fun than a Friday night out.
3, You forgive more.
4, You become more open-minded.
5, You respect differences.
6, You don't force love.
7, You accept heartaches.
8, You don't judge easily.
9, You like to keep quiet instead of engaging in a nonsense fight.
10, Your happiness doesn't depend on other people but on your inner self."
 
Top