Goals/time Management/optimal Living

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#1
Greetings! This is a topic that I have obsessed over, read many books about and struggle with in a good way.
Sometimes I win and sometimes I lose. I try not to lose past an acceptable point that I determined for myself. Feel free to share stories (including your own) , inspirational articles or videos , struggles and/or successes with these themes.

Carpe is the second-person singular present active imperative of carpō "pick or pluck" used by Horace to mean "enjoy, seize, use, make use of".[2] Diem is the accusative case of the noun dies "day". A more literal translation of "carpe diem" would thus be "pluck the day [as it is ripe]"—that is, enjoy the moment.
(Or Act Now!)

I will probably share videos and articles about this topic on an ongoing basis. I even signed up with websites to seize my day, but it really is not rocket science when you think in terms of Act Now:
THE 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE BY STEPHEN COVEY - ANIMATED BOOK REVIEW
How to Set Goals That Will Actually Make You Happy!
PNTV: Time Warrior by Steve Chandler
HOW TO HAVE MORE WILLPOWER - THE WILLPOWER INSTINCT BY KELLY MCGONIGAL ANIMATED BOOK REVIEW
 





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#3
Eat That Frog! - Brian Tracy
PNTV: Eat That Frog! by Brian Tracy
 





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#4
Forget big change, start with a tiny habit: BJ Fogg at TEDxFremont
Top 10 Tips on How to Take Consistent, Impeccable Action to Achieve Your Goals
 





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#6
work/play all actions take a piece of your life:
Jim Rohn: TIME IS VALUABLE - Motivational Speech
 





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#8
Find Your Why, And You’ll Find Your Purpose… with Simon Sinek

 





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#9
We get interesting feedback when we look at our lives with the lens of Pareto's Principle or the 80/20 rule.
What 20% of your activities are important to you, then, can you minimize the time you spend on the 80% of your activities that is wasteful of your time?
Pareto's 80/20 Principle | How to be Productive!
 





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#11
For all those who have goals you are working towards.....
Invest time and attention on the process not the outcome. You will get there when you get there......
Definitely enjoy the process.
The process is what helps you grow.

Depending on goals. I always say: Do not expect overnight success. True success takes time. Time/Effort = better preparation and stability imo
 





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#12
Definitely enjoy the process.
The process is what helps you grow.

Depending on goals. I always say: Do not expect overnight success. True success takes time. Time/Effort = better preparation and stability imo
Thanks for your input!:)
What I find strange is that we can be strong in a process for one area of our lives but weak in another area......o_O
Mastering The Process Vs. Results
 





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Illuminized

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#14
Iamblichus said:
Pythagoras had benefited by the instruction of Thales in many respects, but his greatest lesson had been to learn the value of saving time, which led him to abstain entirely from wine and animal food, avoiding greediness, confining himself to nutriments of easy preparation and digestion. As a result, his sleep was short, his soul pure and vigilant, and the general health of his body was invariable.
According to Diogenes Laertius, Thales said a man was happy when he had "a healthy body, a resourceful mind, and a docile nature." Juvenal said one should "pray for a sound mind in a healthy body". After a year of abstaining from animal food, Seneca said, "I was beginning to feel that my mind was more active."

The ancient Greeks and Romans began from the idea that a healthy mind necessarily sprang forth from a healthy body, that the prerequisite to a healthy mind and character was maintenance of the body. The basis of knowledge must be a healthy body.

If you examine the purported miracles of Jesus, you'll find the majority of them can be categorized either as healings or exorcisms. If you set those aside (I do not deny healings, taking into consideration Apollonius of Tyana and the arts of the Egyptians. Only exorcisms), you are left with the following: feeding of the thousands (x2), catching fish (x2), water into wine, withering of the fig tree, Jesus walking on water, Peter walking on water, Jesus calming the storm. Observe that six of them involve food. Considering the perceived threat of Judaizers, is it not possible that those miracles were distorted by the Catholic Church from parables to justify their consumption? This wouldn't be the first time these were utilized in parables.

Matthew 13:47-50: The kingdom of heaven is like a net thrown into the sea... The Gospel of Thomas lists:

And he said, "The man is like a wise fisherman who cast his net into the sea and drew it up from the sea full of small fish. Among them the wise fisherman found a fine large fish. He threw all the small fish back into the sea and chose the large fish without difficulty. Whoever has ears to hear, let him hear."

There's also the new wine into old wineskins parable...

Fig tree parable: Matthew 24:32-35

If the above is really the case, then Jesus never condoned eating fish or drinking wine. I think it's safe to say that he was a vegetarian.
 





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#15
5 Rituals That Predict Success | Robin Sharma
How to Stay Ultra Inspired | Robin Sharma
 





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#19
https://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/personal_development/
The Future Happens in the #NOW



NOW is where the future happens. In this moment we will take action that will affect our future or we will not. All we have is now.

In #NOW, Max McKeown asks us the think about our now. He says that “for most people, most of the time, it is better to lean towards action than inaction.” People who grab opportunities that are available now, who don’t waste time looking back, and regret-minimizers, are what McKeown calls Nowists. It is a flexible mindset so we can all learn to become a little more Nowist in our approach.

Using Your Past

Nowists don’t ignore the past, but they are good at bringing what they want or need from the past to serve them now for the future. They bring “lessons from their previous experiences and good memories” rather than living in the past. One of the reasons that Nowists can see opportunities is that they are not stuck trying to protect their past; spending time and energy on something that no longer makes sense.

Functional Impulsivity

Nowists don’t act without thinking. That’s dysfunctional. But they do possess a certain kind highly impulsive functional thinking. In a study performed at the University of Michigan on impulsivity, researchers found that there were two impulsive traits. There was the “kind that pushes people to decide quickly in a way that is likely to lead to bad consequences. And the kind that allows people to decide quickly with good results.” Successful Nowists benefit from functional impulsivity. They are good at deciding quickly under pressure and are willing to choose an option even at the cost of making a mistake that they can and are willing to correct as they go forward.

Procrastination

Nowists take control of their time. “Nowists are good “at sequencing their own actions and the actions of others to get to the future on time.” Because they plan, seeing the future as a stream of connected sequences made up of actions and decisions, they can keep their momentum. And because each decision is connected to many actions, they don’t have to make as many decisions. “They can enjoy the pleasure of seeing progress in the past, present, and future, rather than discrete tasks that seem to add up to very little.”

You can avoid procrastination by changing your learning to see your future in your present. “Moving the priorities of your future-self into the present can become such a natural perspective that you are more likely to start something as early as possible than wait too long.” A Nowist leans towards the future from an “active, practical, let’s-make-this-work view of the world.” They only review the past for insights that will help them move forward. They understand cause and effect. “Not everyone sees clear connections between how actions in the past have created the situation in the present, or how actions in the present will shape, or create, the future.” I we can’t make these connections we are “isolated, disconnected and therefore cut off from the power of the #Now.”

We all exist in the #Now. It is only in the #Now that we can think, do, or change anything in the future. A Nowist is an active optimist. They believe they can make good things happen and take action to create a better future.

Now is a good time to think about your #Now. How will you use your #NOW?