Whos good with decyphering symbols? Challenge.

billy t

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Aug 2, 2020
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Hey guys.

Who can decypher the meanings contained within this logo with sources of where you got that understanding from. I've got some books on the topic somewhere but haven't had time to go too far down that rabit hole yet. Whos up for the challenge? You win the challenge you get a virtual chocolate fish.

1600434463202.png?
 






Cintra

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the central part is the new zeland coat of arms.

Wikipedia does a simple job of describing the symbols in a h
heraldic context

CrestSt Edward's Crown
BlazonQuarterly, Azure and Gules on a Pale Argent three Lymphads Sable. In the first quarter, four Mullets in cross of the last, each surmounted by a Mullet of the second (representing the Constellation of the Southern Cross); in the second quarter, a Fleece; in the third, a Garb; and in the fourth, two Mining Hammers in Saltire all Or.[2]
SupportersOn the dexter side, a female figure proper vested Argent supporting in the dexter hand a Flag-staff proper, hoisted thereon the Ensign of the Dominion of New Zealand, and on the sinister side a Maori Rangatira vested proper holding in his dexter hand a Taiaha all proper.[2]
CompartmentSilver fern leaves

The supporters are a white woman and a maori chieftain.
Notice that the woman is on the dexter side, the more important side, whilst the maori is positioned on the sinister side.
The woman also carries a newzeland flag, which itself carries the union flag of britain.
The meaning of this is pretty obvious.
The whites took the maori land in the name of England, and are still more important than the native peoples
Even a white british lady in her nightie is apparently more important that the chieftain in all his power and regalia.

St Edwards crown is the actual crown the monarch gets crowned with, so that just shows again wo is actually in charge.

On the shield itself the symbology is less clear, because heraldry is a weird thing.

The three boats represent an island nation, the name lymphad comes from the gaelic, but they are equally applicable to any island nation.

The stars are the southern cross

the corn sheaves,the fleece and the tools are all representing what england thought new zeland was good for.

So the symbols on the shield describe newzeland as britain wanted it to be, filled with useful things that they could take.

What do you think it means?
 






billy t

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Yes, this analysis seems to be spot on and the symbols all match. Am wondering what the ram signifies as this is also used on the University of Canterbury logo. 1601721918182.pngI assume the Y stands for the York right of Freemasonry.
 






Cintra

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the sheep is a called a fleece in heraldry. its quite interesting.
In my post above i just connected it to sheep, because new zealand has a lot.
However it is an old heraldic symbol, and it is sometimes thought to represent gold, and ite is intimately connected with the order of the golden fleece,which is a chivalric order dating from the 1400s

wikipedia can probably give you a better overview, but they are and have always been very important, especially in mainland europe.


This may suggest that members of that organisation were involved in either the founding of new zealand in some way. The arms were only created in 1911, and slightly redesigned in the 50s. It may well be known exactly why those symbols were used

The university of Canterbury is in New Zealand, Their site explains their coat of arms, which us handy. The Y shows that ribbon thing that bishops wear, because the uni has links to the church.
The fleece on this one is described as silver rather than gold, and both it and the plough mean agriculture.


These are really just surface meanings. Heraldry is complex, like a language only an elite few can read.
When people like me try to read it it is mostly speculation, like guessing at a connection between new zeland and the order of the golden fleece. Or wondering if the Y is a hint toward the York right. It may be, but if you ask they will just say its a bishops wotsit.

But it is fun to look at these heraldic symbols, which are very old and specific, and see who else has used that, because it often indicates a relationship between the two.
For instance you may see a coat of arms split down the middle, with different designs in each. This can often mean that two sets of arms have been inherited from different branches of the family.

But I know very little about new zeland. I am sure that someone (maybe here?) has far more knowledge than me.
Also it may be worth getting a maori speaker to translate the words on both images.

Thank you, by the way. These are very interesting and have been fun to look at.
 






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