Who do Muslims really worship?

Kais_1

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why no?

So you disagree with the fact that the opening line of the koran, does not equate too it being linked to the Ancient Egyptians and canopic jars?
I honestly suggest that you do your own research and you will find that I am correct.

being a born Muslim, I am just as surprised and shocked to learn these truths.
 






Kais_1

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A breakdown from wiki about the four sons of Horus..can anyone see any links?

Imset
(also transcribed Imseti, Amset, Amsety, Mesti, and Mesta) is a funerary deity and one of the Four sons of Horus. He is associated with the canopic jars,[1] specifically the one that contained the liver. Because the Egyptians saw the liver as the seat of human emotion, the depiction of Imset was, unlike his brothers, not associated with any animal but always depicted as a mummified human. Isis was considered his protector and Imset himself was recognized as the patron of the direction of the south. Imset was also associated with a broken heart or death due to excess of emotions, thus his name being translated as "the kindly one" in ancient Egyptian.

Duamutef was, in ancient Egyptian religion, one of the four sons of Horus[1] and a protection god of the canopic jars.[2] Commonly he is said to be the son of the god Horus the Elder. Another myth describes Duamutef and his brothers as sons of Osiris. According to this account, they were born from a lily flower which arose from the primaeval ocean.
Etymology
The name Duamutef means "He who adores his mother". In war, the most frequent cause of death was from injuries in the torso and stomach. The deity protecting this organ was associated with death by war and gained the name Duamutef, meaning "adoring his motherland".[3]

Portrayal

Cover of a canopic jar of the Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt depicting Duamutef, on display at Musée d'Art et d'Histoire in Geneva.
Duamutef was originally represented as a man wrapped in mummy bandages. From the New Kingdom onwards, he is shown with the head of a jackal.[4] In some cases his appearance is confused or exchanged with that of his falcon-headed brother Qebehsenuef, so he has the head of a falcon and Qebehsenuef has the head of a jackal.

Duamutef usually was depicted on coffins and as the lid of canopic jars. Many images of the Judgement of the Dead show him together with his brothers in front of Osiris on a small lily flower.

As protective god of canopic jars
Alongside with Horus' three other sons Imsety, Hapi and Qebehsenuef, Duamutef protected the mummified internal organs. His goal was to protect the stomach.[5] His protector is the goddess Neith.[6]


Hapi, sometimes transliterated as Hapy, is one of the four sons of Horus in ancient Egyptian religion, depicted in funerary literature as protecting the throne of Osiris in the Underworld. Hapi was the son of Heru-ur and Isis or Serqet. He is not to be confused with another god of the same name. He is commonly depicted with the head of a hamadryas baboon, and is tasked with protecting the lungs of the deceased, hence the common depiction of a hamadryas baboon head sculpted as the lid of the canopic jar that held the lungs. Hapi is in turn protected by the goddess Nephthys.[1] When his image appears on the side of a coffin, he is usually aligned with the side intended to face north.[2] When embalming practices changed during the Third Intermediate Period and the mummified organs were placed back inside the body, an amulet of Hapi would be included in the body cavity.[2]

Since drowning was the form of death associated with the lungs, the deity gained the name geese, in reference to floating on water. The spelling of his name includes a hieroglyph which is thought to be connected with steering a boat, although its exact nature is not known. For this reason he was sometimes connected with navigation, although early references call him the great runner, as below from Spell 521 of the Coffin Texts.

You are the great runner; come, that you may join up my father N and not be far in this your name of Hapi, for you are the greatest of my children – so says Horus"[3]
In Spell 151 of the Book of the Dead he is given the following words to say:

I have come that I may be your protection, O N; I have knit together your head and your members, I have smitten your enemies beneath you, and I have given you your head forever.[4]
As one of the four pillars of Shu and one of the four rudders of heaven he was associated with the North, and is specifically referenced as such in Spell 148 in the Book of the Dead.


  • Hapi-(lung) Canopic jar of "Lady Senebtisi"
    God Hapi is spelled in Egyptian language hieroglyphs: "h-p-(det.–Rudder)"


Qebehsenuef ("He who refreshes his brothers") is an ancient Egyptian deity. He is one of the four sons of Horus in Egyptian mythology, the god of protection and of the West.[1] In the preparation of mummies, his canopic jar was used for the intestines. He is seen as a mummy with a falcon head. He was said to be protected by the goddess Serket. The intestine was used in sacrificed animals, by soothsayers, to predict the future, whereas the intestines were also the victims of poison. With death by poison, the canopic jar deity is protected by Serket, who bears the emblem of the scorpion:

[Qebhsennuf saith:] "I am thy son, O Osiris Ani, triumphant. I have come to protect thee. I have collected thy bones, and I have gathered together thy members. I have brought thy heart and I have placed it upon its throne within thy body. I have made thy house to flourish after thee, O thou who livest for ever.[2]
Together with Maa-atef-f, Kheri-beq-f, and Horus-Khenti-maa, the four sons of Horus (the other three were Imset, Hapi and Duamutef) were known as the Seven Shining Ones, protectors of the body of Osiris.
 






Kais_1

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who would have thought....but i am coded into Egyptian scriptures too...

my dob in all of the above again...
 






Mohammed_123

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Im back.

if a admin is reading this can you unlock my KAIS_1 account..

you guys are having a problem with your email server..i am recieving no email codes as i have security on my account set up...

would be appreciated if you can sort this out.

Thanks
 






Mohammed_123

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Now back to my dob being coded into Ancient Egyptian texts.

i found 88 g=7 d=4

88 GD

Jewish folk spell God with a G_D only. still a 74 though with a 88. Below is what i found exactly..........

69842 = illuminati
ra ptah sol sol 88 74

we all know who RA and SOL are....

as for PTAH

What is Ptah known for?
Ptah, also spelled Phthah, in Egyptian religion, creator-god and maker of things, a patron of craftsmen, especially sculptors; his high priest was called “chief controller of craftsmen.” The Greeks identified Ptah with Hephaestus (Vulcan), the divine blacksmith.

i reached my conclusion from the following line of text from the Koran :-

auzubillah minashaitan nirajeem

I AM 50 DJEDI 50
According to some the IAM in the above equation is equal to a pyramid..
PYRAMID (IAM) - ISIS (50) - DJEDI - RA (50)

Therefore according to the opening line in the Koran we are defo worshipping the Egyptian gods....

IAM (God of Moses) - MOTHER (ISIS) (50) - Heaven (DJEDI) or SIRIUS (Osiris spelt backwards is SIRIOS) - SON (HORUS) (50)

4 Pillars of Heaven
4 Canopic Jars
4 Sons of Horus
4 Cardinal Points

Anyone wanting to discuss this further then leave a message.

Ptah
Symbolthe djed pillar, the bull
Parentsnone (self-created or un-created)
ConsortSekhmet and Bast
OffspringNefertem, Maahes


Ptah had no parents; since he was the creator, he came first
 






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Mohammed_123

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The symbolic meaning of eight was prevalent in ancient cultures as they devoutly believed in reincarnation. The ancient Egyptians believed the eight has no significance in this life, but the energy will be taken with you into the next life. However, that determines on your project and the reason why you need inspiration from the eight.
The eight is an indication that you can achieve greater success through dogged determination and ambition. The eight is often associated with business success and authority for this reason, as successful companies and individuals continually strive to improve themselves and their standing in life.
The Eight in Religion and Ancient Cultures
The eight is typically represented by an eight-pointed star or octagon in religion. Sacred numbers are always built into the architecture of religious buildings so you often find eight pillars or arches for example.
In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus delivered eight Beatitudes, virtues that if followed ultimately lead to reward. However, as the Pharaohs believed, the eight beatitudes promise salvation in the next life rather than this.
Scholars believe the eight-pointed star originated in Sumeria. It is associated with the goddess Ianna, who would later become the Babylonian goddess, Ishtar, the light bringer
Ishtar is the Divine Mother, the opener of the womb and light bringer to the world. We see her repeated through history as Isis, Hera, and Juno. We also find symbolism associated with Ishtar in the Statue of Liberty and the Olympic Torch.

The Symbolic Meaning of Eight in Ancient Cultures
Eight appears in Buddhism and Chinese traditions as balance and harmony of the cosmic order whereas the Pythagoreans of ancient Greece expressed the eight as organs of knowledge; fantasy, sense, art, opinion, wisdom, science, and mind.
In ancient Egyptian mythology, Thoth had eight disciples, amongst whom he was the arbitrator. The disciples that learn the arts of magic, science and writing that Thoth oversees.
We can, therefore, consider Thoth as the judge and examiner who decides whether or not you have passed the lessons presented before you in stages one to seven. If you have earned the right to pass through the ninth level, the awards ceremony, before the satisfaction of completing your goal and returning to zero to start the next phase. Of course, you can also fail your tests and return to zero to start over again.
In ancient Greece, eight was given to Dionysus, born in August. Known as Bacchus in Roman mythology this God of agriculture and fertility of nature, like the fermenting process of wine the part God is often depicted with.
Curiously, the number eight is also associated with Hermes – who is also connected with the number one and the number four. So why is Hermes connected with three numbers?
You can find the answer to that in our Numbers Symbolism Course together with many other revelations that you will find beneficial for self-development.
When you see eights repeating in patterns, it signals you have reached understanding of you goal and must choose whether to continue or remain at the seven. If you have knowledge and inner-understanding, your role as an eight is to pass this information on to others.
If the eight appears in relation to your career or a relationship, it is a sign to continue along the same path because you are heading in the right direction.

 






Mohammed_123

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Writing "G-d" instead of God is a fairly recent custom in America. Many believe this to be a sign of respect, and the custom comes from an interpretation of the commandment in Deuteronomy 12:3-4 regarding the destruction of pagan altars. According to the the medieval commentator, Rashi, we should not erase or destroy God’s name and should avoid writing it. In a Responsa (legal opinion) by the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the primary prohibition against erasure of the name God applies to the sacred names in a written text of Torah. With the advent of computers and the internet, rabbinic authorities have debated whether or not this applies to what is typed on a computer or read on a screen. Most have concurred that it does not apply.
The bulk of Jewish legal opinion agrees that the law applies only to the written name of God when written in Hebrew and not when written in other languages. Reform Jewish practice reflects this opinion. Some Jews will avoid discarding paper or books in which God’s name appears in Hebrew. Rather than being thrown out or destroyed, they may be stored in a genizah (a storage place) and buried in a Jewish cemetery


 






Mohammed_123

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Ptah is generally represented in the guise of a man with green skin, contained in a shroud sticking to the skin, wearing the divine beard, and holding a sceptre combining three powerful symbols of ancient Egyptian religion:
  • The Was sceptre
  • The sign of life, Ankh
  • The Djed pillar

Green skin.....father....god...

is this god actually a reptilian???
 






Mohammed_123

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Osiris was green too...

Osiris is represented in his most developed form of iconography wearing the Atef crown, which is similar to the White crown of Upper Egypt, but with the addition of two curling ostrich feathers at each side. He also carries the crook and flail. The crook is thought to represent Osiris as a shepherd god. The symbolism of the flail is more uncertain with shepherds whip, fly-whisk, or association with the god Andjety of the ninth nome of Lower Egypt proposed.[11]
He was commonly depicted as a pharaoh with a complexion of either green (the color of rebirth) or black (alluding to the fertility of the Nile floodplain) in mummiform (wearing the trappings of mummification from chest downward).[23]

 






Mohammed_123

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makes me think of the so called GREEN MAN, that you see on churches or AL KHIDR...

definitely reptilian though!!
 






Mohammed_123

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The name "al-Khiḍr" shares exactly the same triliteral root as the Arabic al-akhḍar or al-khaḍra, a root found in several Semitic languages meaning "green" or "verdant" (as in al-Qubbah al-Khaḍrā’ or the Green Dome). Therefore, the meaning of the name has traditionally been taken to be "the Green One" or "the Verdant One". Some contemporary scholars have disagreed with this assessment;[18] however some others point to a possible reference to the Mesopotamian figure Utnapishtim from the Epic of Gilgamesh through the Arabization of his nickname, "Hasisatra".[19] According to another view, the name Khidr is not an Arabic variant or an abbreviation of Hasisatra, but it may have been derived from the name of the Canaanite god Kothar-wa-Khasis[20][21] and later it may have been assimilated to the Arabic "al-akhḍar".[22]

 






Axl888

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So after 67 pages, did anyone already found out who muslims are really worshipping?
 






Mohammed_123

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Something that's happening in the uk at present

G7

attended by Boris and Biden

g =7

b=2 + b = 4

774

8874 my dob

8+8=16
1+6 =7

=774

something big is going on...and it involves me...but i dunno how.
 






Mohammed_123

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Deuteronomy 13

13 “If a prophet or a dreamer of dreams arises among you and gives you a sign or a wonder, 2 and the sign or wonder that he tells you comes to pass, and if he says, ‘Let us go after other gods,’ which you have not known, ‘and let us serve them,’ 3 you shall not listen to the words of that prophet or that dreamer of dreams. For the Lord your God is testing you, to know whether you love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul. 4 You shall walk after the Lord your God and fear him and keep his commandments and obey his voice, and you shall serve him and hold fast to him. 5 But that prophet or that dreamer of dreams shall be put to death, because he has taught rebellion against the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt and redeemed you out of the house of slavery, to make you leave the way in which the Lord your God commanded you to walk. So you shall purge the evil[a] from your midst.

6 “If your brother, the son of your mother, or your son or your daughter or the wife you embrace[b] or your friend who is as your own soul entices you secretly, saying, ‘Let us go and serve other gods,’ which neither you nor your fathers have known, 7 some of the gods of the peoples who are around you, whether near you or far off from you, from the one end of the earth to the other, 8 you shall not yield to him or listen to him, nor shall your eye pity him, nor shall you spare him, nor shall you conceal him. 9 But you shall kill him. Your hand shall be first against him to put him to death, and afterward the hand of all the people. 10 You shall stone him to death with stones, because he sought to draw you away from the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery. 11 And all Israel shall hear and fear and never again do any such wickedness as this among you.

12 “If you hear in one of your cities, which the Lord your God is giving you to dwell there, 13 that certain worthless fellows have gone out among you and have drawn away the inhabitants of their city, saying, ‘Let us go and serve other gods,’ which you have not known, 14 then you shall inquire and make search and ask diligently. And behold, if it be true and certain that such an abomination has been done among you, 15 you shall surely put the inhabitants of that city to the sword, devoting it to destruction,[c] all who are in it and its cattle, with the edge of the sword. 16 You shall gather all its spoil into the midst of its open square and burn the city and all its spoil with fire, as a whole burnt offering to the Lord your God. It shall be a heap forever. It shall not be built again. 17 None of the devoted things shall stick to your hand, that the Lord may turn from the fierceness of his anger and show you mercy and have compassion on you and multiply you, as he swore to your fathers, 18 if you obey the voice of the Lord your God, keeping all his commandments that I am commanding you today, and doing what is right in the sight of the Lord your God.
 






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