Who do Muslims really worship?

Mohammed_123

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Harut and Marut are two figures mentioned in the Quran (Surah 2:102) associated with magic (sihr) in Babylon. There's some variation in interpretations of their story:

  • The Test: Some Islamic scholars believe they were angels sent to Earth to be tested by the temptations of humanity, particularly magic, idolatry, murder, and immorality. They succumbed to these temptations and were punished, becoming a cautionary tale.
  • Teaching Magic: Others view them as angels who taught magic to humans, but only after clearly warning them of the dangers and emphasizing that true guidance comes from God.

There are also differing views on their fate:

  • Fallen Angels: Some interpretations portray them as fallen angels, condemned to reside in a well or on Earth until the Day of Judgement.
  • Earthly Punishment: Another view is that they were allowed to choose their punishment, opting for earthly suffering over Hell.

The Quran itself focuses on the message that magic is a temptation and that true knowledge comes from God.
 

Mohammed_123

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There's a strong link between the Triple Goddess and Wicca. Here's how:

  • The Triple Goddess represents the Maiden, Mother, and Crone, symbolizing life stages and the moon phases.
  • Wiccan Beliefs: Many Wiccans view the Goddess as a triple deity embodying these three aspects.
    • The Mother Goddess is often seen as particularly important.
    • Some traditions even focus more on the Goddess than a God.
  • Ritual and Symbolism: The Triple Goddess is incorporated into Wiccan rituals and represented by symbols like the Triple Moon.

It's important to note that Wicca isn't the only religion that uses the Triple Goddess concept, but it is a central part of Wiccan belief for many practitioners.
 

Mohammed_123

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Mother goddesses are a fascinating phenomenon across cultures and history. Here's a deeper dive into their characteristics and significance:

Who are they?

  • Core essence: Mother goddesses embody motherhood, fertility, and creation. They're seen as nurturing figures who bring forth life and ensure abundance.
  • Diverse roles: Their roles go beyond just childbirth. They might be associated with love, sexuality, the harvest, or even war (as protectors).
  • Examples: From Isis in Egypt to Cybele in Anatolia, countless cultures have had mother goddesses.

Why were they important?

  • Focus on life: In societies heavily reliant on agriculture and childbirth, mother goddesses provided a sense of security and hope.
  • Explaining the world: They offered a way to understand natural cycles, the mysteries of birth, and the power of the earth's bounty.
  • Community and ritual: Worshipping mother goddesses often involved rituals promoting fertility, ensuring good harvests, and celebrating motherhood.

Interesting aspects:

  • Earth Mother: Sometimes, mother goddesses are seen as personifications of the Earth itself, the source of all life.
  • Triple Goddess: In some traditions, a mother goddess takes three forms: Maiden, Mother, and Crone, representing the cycle of life, death, and rebirth.
  • Modern interpretations: The concept of the mother goddess continues to inspire artists, writers, and spiritual seekers today.

If you'd like to explore further, here are some specific goddesses:

  • Cybele (Anatolia): Great Mother Goddess associated with fertility, wild animals, and city walls.
  • Isis (Egypt): Powerful goddess of motherhood, magic, and protection.
  • Demeter (Greece): Goddess of agriculture, harvest, fertility, and sacred law.
  • Freyja (Norse): Goddess of love, beauty, war, and fertility.

This is just a starting point! There are many more fascinating mother goddesses to discover around the world.
 

Mohammed_123

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The word "siparah" itself isn't Arabic, but it's used to refer to a specific division of the Quran.

Here's the breakdown:

  • Arabic word: Juz (جُزْءْ) - meaning "part"
  • Siparah: This is a Persian word, where "si" means 30.

Both "siparah" and "juz" refer to one of the thirty equal parts the Quran is divided into. The term "juz" is more commonly used in Arabic, while "siparah" is prevalent in regions influenced by Persian languages like Urdu.

CAN YOU FIND THE BULL?

:)
 

Mohammed_123

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Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody


MAD INA in Saudia Arabia

MAD AIN = EYE

MAD EYE

:)
 

Mohammed_123

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The word "siparah" itself isn't Arabic, but it's used to refer to a specific division of the Quran.

Here's the breakdown:

  • Arabic word: Juz (جُزْءْ) - meaning "part"
  • Siparah: This is a Persian word, where "si" means 30.

Both "siparah" and "juz" refer to one of the thirty equal parts the Quran is divided into. The term "juz" is more commonly used in Arabic, while "siparah" is prevalent in regions influenced by Persian languages like Urdu.

CAN YOU FIND THE BULL?

:)
Siparah
APIS -RA-H

Can also be worked out as HAAGRID

Another character from Harry Potter

 

Mohammed_123

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Siparah
APIS -RA-H

Can also be worked out as HAAGRID

Another character from Harry Potter

The name Hagrid doesn't have a clear-cut meaning. There are a couple of interesting theories though:

  • Worried: This meaning comes from the Old English word "hagridden" which means "worried". While it might seem like an odd fit for the warm and friendly Hagrid, author J.K. Rowling herself has said she based the name on this term [Harry Potter Character Names Etymology].
  • Dialect word for a bad night: Another theory is that Hagrid is derived from an old English dialect word referring to someone who had a rough night [YourDictionary]. This could be a nod to Hagrid's fondness for magical creatures, some of whom might be a handful to take care of.
It's important to remember that author J.K. Rowling often chose names that evoked a certain feeling or image. So while the exact meaning might be debatable, the name Hagrid definitely fits the image of a large, gruff but kindhearted character.
 

Mohammed_123

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Culcucan = quetzacoatl = nommos = DAGON = NO GOD /GAD OR NO DOG/DAG
The word "gad" for the ancients could have two main meanings:
  • Fortune or luck: This was the most common meaning, and "gad" was even the name of a pan-Semitic god associated with good fortune. Similar to the Roman Fortuna or the Greek Tyche, Gad was seen as a deity who distributed luck and blessings. You can find references to this meaning in the Bible, where some translations mention "Gad" as a deity (e.g., Isaiah 65:11).
  • Troop or band: This meaning is less frequent and seems to be connected to the root verb meaning "to cut or divide." The idea here is that "gad" refers to a group that has been divided or set apart, possibly a military unit.
It's important to note that the meaning of "gad" depended on the context and the specific culture using the word.

Here's what we know about the ancient deity Gad:
  • Pan-Semitic God of Fortune: Gad was worshipped by various Semitic peoples, including Aram and Arabia, and represented good luck and fortune.
  • Depiction and Gender: While typically depicted as male, there's some evidence of Gad being portrayed as female as well, especially in the Hellenistic period (influenced by Greek concepts).
  • Possible Origins: The root word for Gad is connected to "cut" or "divide," potentially linking it to the idea of fate being apportioned.
  • Scope of Influence: Gad wasn't just a general god of luck; texts mention him as a patron of specific places (mountains, cities), houses, or even the entire world.
  • Comparison to Other Deities: Similar figures include the Roman Fortuna and the Greek Tyche, both personifying luck and fate.
Here are some additional points to consider:
  • Limited Information: Unfortunately, there aren't many detailed records or depictions of Gad compared to major deities. Our understanding comes from scattered references and interpretations.
  • Biblical Mention: The Book of Isaiah (Isaiah 65:11) mentions Gad, with some translations referring to him as a deity worshipped by some Hebrews during the Babylonian captivity.
  • Debate on Personification: Scholars debate whether Gad was truly a fully formed deity or more of a concept or personification of fortune.If you'd like to delve deeper, you can explore these resources (but be mindful they might not be directly linked due to my safety policy):

  • Wikipedia: Gad (deity)
  • Journal Article (jstor): "The God Gad" explores the concept and evidence for Gad's worship

Who is the god of gad?


Gad (deity) - Wikipedia


Gad was the name of the pan-Semitic god of fortune, usually depicted as a male but sometimes as a female, and is attested in ancient records of Aram and Arabia


so many things...i need to look into this further...gimmie a day or two
 
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Mohammed_123

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Gad was the name of the pan-Semitic god of fortune, usually depicted as a male but sometimes as a female,[2] and is attested in ancient records of Aram and Arabia. Gad is also mentioned in the bible as a deity in the Book of Isaiah (Isaiah 65:11 – some translations simply call him (the god of) Fortune), as having been worshipped by a number of Hebrews during the Babylonian captivity.[3] Gad apparently differed from the god of destiny, who was known as Meni. The root verb in Gad means cut or divide, and from this comes the idea of fate being meted out.[4]
 

Mohammed_123

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Looks like GAD was the god of the jews, when they were in Babylon.

The full word is DAG - ON

ON or NO...........?

which is it?

The ancient christians and muslims are for this...

NO GAD

NO GOD
 
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