Who Changed the Sabbath day from Saturday to Sunday?

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Related - who changed Sabbath to Friday or Sunday to Friday?
The Jewish day is from evening to evening. So Fri. evening till Sat. evening is the Sabbath. The Sabbath was simply a day of rest for man and animal. and was given to the Jew. Paul always went to the Jewish Temples to preach the Gospel to the Jew first, but the first day of the week, The church always met for fellowship, teaching and praising the Lord. The Sabbath was not changed, but the Church is not under law, but under the law of Christ. In my time, that is why there was no work on Saturday or Sunday for Jew and Gentile and a law called the Blue Law that stores on Sunday could not sell anything that had to do with work....but only food and were only open for about four hours. The Blue Law is still on the books but as the world turns more vial and immoral, God is ignored.
 





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Christ Fulfills the Law

" “Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled. Whoever therefore breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches men so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does and teaches them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven. For I say to you, that unless your righteousness exceeds the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven." Matthew 5:17-20.


Can somebody be truly saved if they don't keep the Ten Commandments?
The answer is yes. Of course, there are going to be many people saved, and no one is saved by keeping any law. We are saved by grace alone.

However, at the same time, nobody will be saved who willingly disobeys. The Bible says, "For if we sin willfully after we have received the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins" Hebrew 10:26. So at that point it is open rebellion against God. And how can God accept that into heaven?
No. The answer cannot be both "yes" and "no" at the same time. This is called "cognitive dissonance" (trying to hold two contradictory ideas in your mind at the same time).

It is either yes or it is no and it cannot be both. Keeping the Commandments of God is a Salvation issue so the answer is no.

If somebody is not keeping the Commandments then they are not truly saved.
 





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I know you did not mention Sunday or Constatine. I did. Can I not mention them? They are connected to why the day was changed from Saturday to sunday.

First of all there is not such thing as a Hebrew Sabbath. God gave the Sabbath at creation to mankind. Adam and Eve were not Jewish. The first Jew we read about in the Bible is Abraham and Sabbath had been observed for a long time before Abraham. The Jews just continued to observe the Sabbath God gave at creation. We are all supposed to continue to observe the Sabbath that God gave us all as a day or rest and worship.

Babylonian paganism and all the other kinds of paganism began after creation. The Sabbath predates the Babylonian fake sabbath. So you are wrong.
Do you seriously believe the Babylonians didn't have a creation story that precedes Genesis? The day of mid-rest was mentioned in the Enuma Elish as Sabattu long before the first letter of the Torah was written.

Reconstruction of the broken Enûma Eliš tablet seems to define the rarely attested Sapattum or Sabattum as the full moon. This word is cognate or merged with Hebrew Shabbat (cf. Genesis 2:2-3), but is monthly rather than weekly; it is regarded as a form of Sumerian sa-bat ("mid-rest"), attested in Akkadian as um nuh libbi ("day of mid-repose"). This conclusion is a contextual restoration of the damaged tablet, which is read as "[Sa]bbath shalt thou then encounter, mid[month]ly."​

Bloody fundamentalists ...
 





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Jesus kept the Sabbath Day (The Lord's Day) and taught people on the Sabbath and about properly keeping it.

Matthew
12:8 For the Son of Man is Lord even of the Sabbath day.
12:9 And when he was departed thence, he went into their church:
12:10 And, behold, there was a man which had [his] hand withered. And they asked him, saying, Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath days? that they might accuse him.
12:11 And he said unto them, What man shall there be among you, that shall have one sheep, and if it fall into a pit on the Sabbath day, will he not lay hold on it, and lift [it] out?
12:12 How much then is a man better than a sheep? Wherefore it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath days.

Luke
4:30 But he passing through the midst of them went his way,
4:31 And came down to Capernaum, a city of Galilee, and taught them on the Sabbath days.
 





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Do you seriously believe the Babylonians didn't have a creation story that precedes Genesis? The day of mid-rest was mentioned in the Enuma Elish as Sabattu long before the first letter of the Torah was written.

Reconstruction of the broken Enûma Eliš tablet seems to define the rarely attested Sapattum or Sabattum as the full moon. This word is cognate or merged with Hebrew Shabbat (cf. Genesis 2:2-3), but is monthly rather than weekly; it is regarded as a form of Sumerian sa-bat ("mid-rest"), attested in Akkadian as um nuh libbi ("day of mid-repose"). This conclusion is a contextual restoration of the damaged tablet, which is read as "[Sa]bbath shalt thou then encounter, mid[month]ly."​



Bloody fundamentalists ...
I believe in God the creator of this world. I believe He instituted Sabbath at creation as a memorial. I believe in His Word not the Babylonians. I'm not interested in their lies and paganism.
 





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Eight Scriptures that Discuss the Sabbath
Summary: Colossians 2 is not the only tricky passage of Scripture about the Sabbath. Eight specific texts are often used to discredit the seventh-day Day Sabbath when, in fact, they support it.


Some Christians, who are determined to prove that the Sabbath has been transferred from Saturday to Sunday, use eight texts in the Bible to support their viewpoint. These verses in fact support the seventh-day Sabbath rather than deny it.

1. "In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre" (Matthew 28:1).

The New English Bible (NEB) renders the verse this way:

"The Sabbath had passed, and it was about daybreak on Sunday when Mary of Magdala and the other Mary came to look at the grave."

Where the Authorized Version or King James Version says “the first day of the week,” the NEB says "Sunday."

Two days are mentioned. One is given a sacred title, “the end of the Sabbath,” and the other numerical value, “first day of the week.” Note also the first day did not begin until “the end of the Sabbath.” There is no transfer of the Sabbath day here.

Sunday sanctity is missing here, and it is not explained in the surrounding verses either. In fact, Mary did not attend to Jesus on the

Sabbath day, because she rested in accordance with the commandment:

"Then they returned and prepared spices and fragrant oils. And they rested on the Sabbath, according to the commandment" (Luke 23:56 NKJV).

2. "And when the sabbath was passed, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, had bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint him. And very early in the morning the first day of the week, they came unto the sepulchre at the rising of the sun" (Mark 16:1-2).

Mark’s record was, according to some scholars, written approximately ten years after the resurrection. Mark refers to the same event as was described by Matthew, and he agrees with Matthew that the Sabbath was passed. Again, we have Biblical evidence that the Sabbath and the “first day” are two distinct and separate days. Certainly Mark places no sacredness on the first day in this reference. Jesus’ followers had come on Sunday to engage in labor the customary “embalming” of the body of the crucified Christ. They knew no sacredness attached to the day and were prepared to toil at a very unpleasant task.

3. "Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, He appeared first to Mary Magdalene out of whom He had cast seven devils" (Mark 16:9).

There is not a word in this verse indicating that Sunday should be the new Christian Sabbath.

4. "And that day was the preparation, and the sabbath drew on. And the women also, which came with Him from Galilee, followed after, and beheld the sepulcher, and how His body was laid. And they returned, and prepared spices and ointments; and rested the sabbath day according to the commandment. Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the morning, they came unto the sepulchre, bringing the spices which they had prepared, and certain others with them" (Luke 23:54-24:1).

Christ was crucified on Friday afternoon before sunset and “that day was the preparation, and the Sabbath drew on.” Friday was called “the preparation,” implying preparation for the Sabbath. The Sabbath began at sunset. The Sabbath was observed from Friday evening until Saturday evening. God ordained the reckoning of the day from sunset to sunset right from the very dawn of history:

"And the evening and the morning were the first day...the evening and the morning were the second day" (Genesis 1:5,8).

5. "The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre" (John 20:1).

The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John each give parallel accounts of the work of Christ on Earth. This is the reason for the repetition in the above verses quoted. Nothing is said about Sunday sacredness, nothing to suggest that Sunday should be kept as the Sabbath.

6. "Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you" (John 20:19).


The text says nothing about the disciples holding a meeting in honour of Christ’s resurrection. In fact, they took the resurrection report of Luke as “idle tales, and they believed them not” (Luke 24:11).
As is stated clearly in John 20:19, “the doors were shut” not for a meeting or celebration of the resurrection, but “for fear of the Jews.” The disciples were hiding from the Jewish persecutors. They assembled from fear, not for worship. While it is true that Christ rose from the grave on Sunday, there is no evidence for keeping Sunday in honour of the resurrection. The Bible teaches that baptism, rather than Sunday, is the memorial to the resurrection of Christ.
 





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Like the passages in the Gospels that discuss the Sabbath, two other New Testament verses are used to validate Sunday Sabbath when they really validate Saturday Sabbath:


1. "The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us…by the resurrection of Jesus Christ" (1 Peter 3:21).

See also Romans 6:3-4; Colossians 2:12.
While there are as many as 84 Sabbath services recorded in Acts, there is only one mention of the first day, and it does not support Sunday sacredness:

"And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight" (Acts 20:7).

The New English Bible identifies the time:
"When the disciples came together to break bread, on the Saturday night in order to assemble for the breaking of bread, Paul, who was to leave the next day, addressed them, and went on speaking until midnight" (Acts 20:7 NEB).

An evening meeting is recorded on the first day of the week. This means that since the Sabbath ended at sunset, the first day of the week began according to Bible reckoning. The New English Bible puts it in modern language and uses the words “on Saturday night.” It is recorded that Paul continued his speech until midnight on Saturday.

Evidently, Paul had visited all day Sabbath with them, and was persuaded to stay on that night and speak further. According to Acts 20:11, “talked a long while, even till break of day, so he departed.”

Paul did not stay on the Sunday, which would have been the case if Sunday was the new Sabbath. Indeed, it was only after the Sabbath that the disciples came together to have a meal together, and Paul spoke to them until daybreak on Sunday morning, and then left on a long journey by foot, an act that would never have been sanctioned on the Sabbath day. The fact that Paul undertook a long journey by foot alone shows that the first day of the week—Sunday was not held in any special regard. The text is thus in support of Sabbath sanctity, rather than Sunday sanctity.

The fact that the disciples broke bread together on the Sunday is often used as a support of Sunday worship. This is however not the case, as the disciples ate together every day of the week. The partaking of communion is not limited to Sunday:

"And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their food with gladness and singleness of heart" (Acts 2:46).

"For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come" (1 Corinthians 11:26).


2. "Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye. Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come" (1 Corinthians 16:1-2).

Paul is referring to tithes and offerings set aside for God's work. This was to be done on the first day of the week. Paul regarded the sanctity of the Sabbath so highly that he suggested that the calculating of tithes and offerings should not be carried out until after the preparation day and the Sabbath. He suggested rather that this work be done on the first day of the week, so that it wouldn’t be spent on other less necessary items in the course of the subsequent week. Rather than to detract from the Saturday Sabbath, this verse supports it.

https://amazingdiscoveries.org/S-deception-Sabbath_New_Testament_Acts
 





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For the fourth time: I never mentioned anything about Sunday or Constantine. The Babylonian sabattu precedes the Hebrew shabbat by centuries. It was dedicated to the same deity, had the same type of prohibitions and it's in the same mythological family. That both versions of the "mid-rest day" are related seems alot more rational to assume than to believe sixth century BC scripture overrides all other archeological and historical evidence that predates it.
+1 for previous fast from the world

I was reading your links on the Babylonian sabattu, that occurred every month, I believe. I can see the similarities, in principle. I'm curious, though-- are you tying it to the Torah or the Babylonian talmud, when you say it was dedicated to the same deity ?
 





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@Artful Revealer

I'm a fundamentalist for believing in only God and His Word and not Babylonian hocus pocus nonsense you've posted here? Then let me be a fundamentalist. Babylonian paganism is complete and utter nonsense and they can't save anyone! Its Satan trying to take worship away from God. He's been doing it for millennia but he will be destroyed in the end. He has lost the battle already. All that is waiting for him is hell and he will never exist again after that.
 





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@Artful Revealer

I'm a fundamentalist for believing in only God and His Word and not Babylonian hocus pocus nonsense you've posted here? Then let me be a fundamentalist. Babylonian paganism is complete and utter nonsense and they can't save anyone! Its Satan trying to take worship away from God. He's been doing it for millennia but he will be destroyed in the end. He has lost the battle already. All that is waiting for him is hell and he will never exist again after that.
Amen. My point was that Adam, Noah and Moses told the story of God and creation before Babylon ever existed. But every Gentile tribe made up their own story, taking some of the original and adding to or excluding thing to make their own story (agents of Satan). Just like Satan changed what God told Adam and Eve about the Garden and the tree of life....He made God out to be a liar and beguiled Eve, even as he still does today. People think he will be setting on the throne in Hell handing out torture, Bet He will be suffering just like his minion's.
 





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Can’t we keep holy any day of the week?

Upon tables of stone God wrote the great, unchanging law of the ages. Every word was serious and meaningful. Not one line was ambiguous or mysterious. Christians and non-Christians, educated and uneducated, have no problem understanding the simple, clear words of the Ten Commandments. God meant what He said and said what He meant.

Most of the ten begin with the same words: “You shall not,” but right in the heart of the law, we find the fourth commandment introduced with the word Remember.” Why is this one different? God was commanding His people to call something to memory that existed but had been forgotten. Genesis describes the origin of the Sabbath in these words: “Thus the heavens and the earth, and all the host of them, were finished. And on the seventh day God ended His work which He had done. … Then God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it” (Genesis 2:1–3).

Which day did God bless and sanctify? The seventh day. How was it to be kept holy? By resting. Could any of the other six days be kept holy? No. Why? Because God commanded work on those days, not rest. Does God’s blessing make a difference? Of course. This is why parents pray for God to bless their children. They believe it makes a difference. The seventh day is different from all the other six days because it carries God’s blessing.

The seventh day is akin to celebrating the birthday of the world, a memorial of a mighty act. The Sabbath memorial could never truly be changed because it points back to an established event in history. In the United States, for instance, July 4 is Independence Day. Can it be changed? No. Because the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776. Your birthday cannot be changed, either. It is a memorial of your birth, which happened on a set day. History would have to run through again to change your birthday, to change Independence Day, or to change the Sabbath day. We can call another day Independence Day, and we can call another day the Sabbath, but that does not make it so.

Did God ever give man the privilege of choosing his own day of rest? He did not. In fact, God confirmed in the Bible that the Sabbath was settled and sealed by His own divine selection and should not be tampered with. Read Exodus 16 concerning the giving of manna. For 40 years God worked three miracles every week to show Israel which day was holy: (1) He rained manna from heaven for His people to eat. (2) It did not fall on the seventh day. (3) Although it spoiled if kept overnight, it remained sweet and fresh when kept over the seventh day.

“Now it happened that some of the people went out on the seventh day to gather, but they found none. And the Lord said to Moses, ‘How long do you refuse to keep My commandments and My laws?” (Exodus 16:27, 28).

Perhaps these people had the same idea as many modern-day Christians and thought another day could be kept just as well as the seventh day. Maybe they were planning to observe the first day of the week, or some other day that was more convenient to them. What happened? God immediately and clearly declared that they were breaking His law. Would God say the same thing today? Yes. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever (Hebrews 13:8). “I am the Lord, I do not change” (Malachi 3:6).

God made it very clear that, whatever their selfish justification for it, those who went out to work on the Sabbath were guilty of breaking His law. James explained that it is a sin to break even one of the Ten Commandments: “For whoever shall keep the whole law, and yet stumble in one point, he is guilty of all. For He who said, ‘Do not commit adultery,’ also said, ‘Do not murder.’ Now if you do not commit adultery, but you do murder, you have become a transgressor of the law" (James 2:10, 11).

Can’t we keep holy any day of the week? By this argument Satan is preparing the world to accept a substitute for the Sabbath that God clearly commanded.

https://www.sabbathtruth.com/faq/fr.../id/924/cant-we-keep-holy-any-day-of-the-week
 





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Isn't obedience legalism?

Some teach that after the law has accomplished its purpose of pointing a sinner to Christ for forgiveness and cleansing, the commandments are no longer needed in the experience of a believer. Is that true?

A Christian will continue to depend upon the “watchdog” of the law to reveal any deviations from the true path of righteousness and to point him or her back to the cleansing cross of Jesus. This mirror of correction will most certainly be needed in the progressive growth experience of the Christian.

Law and grace do not work in competition with one another, but rather they work in perfect cooperation. The law points out our sin, and grace saves from sin. The law is the will of God, and grace is the power to do the will of God. We do not obey the law in order to be saved; rather, we obey because we are saved. Revelation 14:12 says, “Here is the patience of the saints: here are they that keep the Commandments of God, and the Faith of Jesus." What a perfect description of faith and works! And the combination is found in those who are “saints.”

Our work of obedience is a true test of our love. This is why obedience is necessary in the experience of a true believer. “Faith without works is dead” (James 2:20). No man ever won a woman’s heart by words alone. Had there been no acts of devotion, no gifts of love, most men would still be searching for a companion. Jesus said, “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven” (Matthew 7:21).

A profession of your faith or mere words saying you love the Lord are not enough. The true evidence lies in a person’s obedience. Today’s bumper stickers reflect a shallow concept of love. They say, “Honk if you love Jesus,” but Jesus said, “If you love Me, keep My commandments” (John 14:15). And that is exactly what most people don’t want to do. They are glad to smile and say nice words, but if their lifestyle is disturbed, the majority will reject it. Unfortunately, most people today are not looking for truth. They are looking for a smooth, easy, comfortable religion that will allow them to live the way they please and still give them the assurance of salvation. Yet no true religion can do that for them.

One of the strongest texts in the Bible on this subject is found in 1 John 2:4. “He who says, ‘I know Him,’ and does not keep His commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him.” The apostle John could write that with such assurance because it is one of the most deeply established truths in the Bible. Jesus spoke of those who say, “Lord, Lord” but do not do the will of the Father. Then He described many who would seek entrance to the kingdom claiming to be workers of miracles in the name of Christ. But He would sorrowfully have to say, “I never knew you. Depart from me.” (See Matthew 7:21–23).

You see, to know Christ is to love Him, and to love Him is to obey Him. The valid assumption of the Bible writers is very clear and simple: If one is not obeying Christ, he or she must not truly love Christ. John assured us, “This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent” (John 17:3). Thus, we can see how knowing and loving and obeying are all tied closely together and are absolutely inseparable in the life of God's faithful people. John summed it up in these words: “For this is the love of God, that we keep His commandments. And His commandments are not burdensome” (1 John 5:3).

https://www.sabbathtruth.com/faq/frequently-asked-questions/id/1020/isnt-obedience-legalism
 





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Isn't obedience legalism?
Obedience to what? To the Mosiac Law or The Law of Christ? Yes,The Law of Moses is legalism. But the Born again believer is under the Law of Christ (That is the Church). There is no law in love. The change of a born again believer is described in1 Corinthians Chapter 13. Most of the warnings in the epistles to The Church are to the self righteous and the tares and those who PREVERT The Gospel. Nothing can separate us from the Love of God in Jesus Christ of a born again believer. Romans Chapter 8
 





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When Does The Sabbath Start?

When does the Sabbath start? That may seem like a no-brainer, but from Creation through Bible times, the days did not begin and end at midnight as they do today. Genesis 1:5 says, “The evening and the morning were the first day.” A day began when the preceding day closed, at sunset. The dark part of the day came first, then the light part.

In describing how to honor one of the feast days, God instructed the Israelites, “From evening to evening, you shall celebrate your sabbath” (Leviticus 23:32). “Evening” is when the sun becomes even with the horizon, what we call sunset. “In the evening, at the going down of the sun ...” (Deuteronomy 16:6). “That evening, after sunset …” (Mark 1:32).

When the Israelites returned to Jerusalem after the Babylonian captivity, Nehemiah had to teach them how to observe the Sabbath. To prevent the Israelites from carrying on their usual day-to-day business on Sabbath, Nehemiah commanded that the gates of Jerusalem be shut “when the evening shadows fell on the gates of Jerusalem before the Sabbath” (Nehemiah 13:15-19).

When the sun goes down on Friday evening, Sabbath begins. It is this creation memorial that we are to remember and keep holy (Exodus 20:8).

- Emily Thomsen

https://www.sabbathtruth.com/free-resources/article-library/id/915/when-does-the-sabbath-start
 





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Christ, in fulfilling the moral law, abolished it.

It has been said that Christ, in fulfilling the moral law, actually abolished the Ten Commandments. However, let's take a look at what Jesus actually says in Matthew 5:17–19:
  1. "Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets" (v. 17). Jesus certainly did not do the very thing that He came not to do!
  2. "I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill." According to Webster's Dictionary, "fulfill," when applied to a law, means "to answer its demands by obedience." It here means the opposite of "destroy," as in the following scriptures: "And shall not uncircumcision, which is by nature, if it fulfill the law, judge thee, who by the letter and circumcision dost transgress the law?" (Romans 2:27) "Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ" (Galatians 6:2). "If ye fulfill the royal law, according to the scripture, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself, ye do well" (James 2:8).

    Thus, those who make this argument would have Christ teach that He came not to destroy the law but to destroy the law. That doesn't make sense, does it?
  3. "Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in nowise pass from the law" (Matthew 5:18). Heaven and earth still remain; thus, we can know from Jesus' own lips that the law was not and has not been abolished.
  4. "Till all is fulfilled" (Matthew 5:18). This passage was originally written in Greek. In the Greek language, words that go together must share certain qualities, such as gender or number. The word "all" is neuter in gender and plural in number. Therefore, it cannot refer directly to “law,” which is masculine in gender and singular in number. “All” refers to all things respecting heaven and earth that are spoken of in the prophets (Old Testament).

    The term “fulfilled” in this verse comes from a different Greek word than the word “fulfilled” in the expression, "I did not come to destroy, but to fulfill" (verse 17). Here in verse 18, this word means “to come into existence, be created, exist by creation” (William Greenfield, A Greek-English Lexicon to the New Testament). This word “fulfilled” is translated as “made” in John 1:3: "All things were made by him" (KJV). So, again, “fulfill” actually means the opposite of “destroy.”
  5. Now comes Christ's own conclusion: "Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least [or, as George Campbell renders it, "shall be of no esteem"] in the kingdom of heaven; but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 5:19). And to emphasize the point that the law is not abolished, Christ proceeds to explain certain precepts of the law in question in their most spiritual and comprehensive sense.
This law could not cease when Christ came. Three interesting "tills" or "untils" in the New Testament provides convincing evidence of this truth:
  1. "The law and the prophets were until John" (Luke 16:16). At the time of John the Baptist, there was a change in the law and the prophets, when he began preaching the kingdom of God. The kingdom of God did not do away with the law and the prophets but added to them. Christ confirmed this in the next verse, making the law firmer than the very pillars of heaven and earth: "And it is easier," He said, "for heaven and earth to pass away than for one tittle of the law to fail" (verse 17).
  2. "Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in nowise pass from the law."
  3. "Till all be fulfilled" (Matthew 5:18). That is, ; till all those things to be restored are brought into existence by a new creation. This brings us to the new-earth state, in which righteousness shall dwell (2 Peter 3:13; Psalm 119:172; Isaiah 51:6, 7), and the Sabbath shall continue while eternal ages roll (Isaiah 66:22, 23).
This objection suggests the false doctrine that Christ is the minister of sin. Rather, we believe the Scriptures teach that Christ came to conquer Satan and sin. But according to this objection, the great object of God in sending His Son is frustrated, and Satan and sin triumph at last, for Christ grants men full liberty to transgress all the commandments of God!

As we have seen, the argument that Christ abolished the law is refuted by the Savior’s own words in Matthew chapter 5, by Peter’s prophecy in 2 Peter 3, by the testimony of Old Testament writers in Psalm 119 and Isaiah 51, and by the fact that Christ cannot be the minister of sin.

https://www.sabbathtruth.com/faq/ar...rist-in-fulfilling-the-moral-law-abolished-it
 





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The sabbath was made for man.

As in no man need to work seven days a week.

Jesus got a lot of problem from Jews when doing good works on the sabbath. So it's right and fair that Christians pick another day like the Resurrection day... so the Jews can just keep their sabbath.
 





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Exodus 8“Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.9“Six days you shall labor and do all your work,10but the seventh day is a sabbath of the LORD your God; in it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant or your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you.

John 17But He answered them, "My Father is working until now, and I Myself am working."

Torah says "no work"
Jesus says "I work"

Love needs no day off...

Love is more important than rule keeping...
 





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How should I honor it?

The fourth commandment says, “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy” (Exodus 20:8). Once you’ve learned about the Sabbath, the next logical question is, “How do I keep it holy?”


Keep It Simple

How many of the Ten Commandments have you debated the meaning of with your friends? Probably not very many! God is pretty straightforward. So why have we made the fourth one so complicated?

For thousands of years, man has applied his interpretation to the Sabbath. By the time Jesus began His ministry, the Pharisees had hundreds of regulations regarding the Sabbath—as well as hundreds of corresponding loopholes to get around observing them. They were so tied to their cultural traditions that when God arrived in their midst, teaching and working miracles, they denied His divinity because He didn’t do what their cultural traditions dictated. How about us? Are we tied to cultural traditions?

Principles of Bible Study

In order to learn what God says about a topic, we must try to put aside everything we’ve previously learned about that topic. For those of us who were raised Christians, that’s difficult to do! But come to God with an open heart and ask Him to guide you.

Two over-arching principles govern the study of any biblical topic:

1. If you are earnestly seeking God’s will, you will find it. Let your prayer be as David’s, “Send forth your light and your truth, let them guide me; let them bring me to your holy mountain, to the place where you dwell” (Psalm 43:3), and God will follow through on His promise: “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled” (Matthew 5:6).

2. Whatever you do must spring out of your faith-relationship with Jesus. “Everything that does not come from faith is sin” (Romans 14:23). In any area of our lives, the issue is attitude, either of submission to or rebellion against God’s authority. Our choices must come as a result of our humble request for God’s guidance. If there is any hint of rebellion, reluctance or resentment in our attitude, God is not pleased by our actions, and we certainly receive no merit from them. We might be doing the “right” thing but have the wrong attitude about it. It's still wrong in God’s eyes. Likewise, we might be doing the “wrong” thing, but have the right attitude, and be blessed by God. “Only let us live up to what we have already attained” (Philippians 3:16). What good does it do to ask God for guidance and then refuse to follow His leading?

How to Keep the Sabbath Holy?

The Sabbath is mentioned many times in both the Old and New Testaments. But an exhaustive study of every reference reveals only a few specifics of what to do or not do on the Sabbath, all of which applied to a vastly different culture than ours. God’s lack of explicit instructions can be frustrating. How do we know that we’re keeping the Sabbath the “right” way? We must use our intellect, guided by His Word and our relationship with Him, to determine the principles behind His instructions.

Really the only “black and white” instruction on the Sabbath is not to do any work. “Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates” (Exodus 20:9, 10). God made it clear that the entire household should have the opportunity to be refreshed by a Sabbath rest.

Many ask then, and justifiably so, what is work? I mean, besides the obvious of going to your place of occupation and trying to earn a living; what about yard work? Housework? Meal preparation? Physical exertion, like hiking or swimming or rock climbing? The answer to these questions is less clear, but the principles seem to be:

  • The Sabbath is to be a “cessation from previous occupation”—an opportunity to rest from your normal day-to-day pursuits.

  • The Sabbath is an opportunity to rest from your material pursuits, thus demonstrating that you trust God will bless your efforts over the last six days, and provide for your material needs.

While the Scriptures do not command it in so many words, some are blessed by using Friday to prepare for the Sabbath: clean the house, shop for groceries, even prepare ahead some of the meals. This way, when Sabbath begins, all of those household things are taken care of and you may take a deep breath and fully indulge in a day of rest. On the flip side, viewing this goal as an absolute can result in pressure to do so much preparation that Friday becomes a burden! Sometimes an act of faith is manifested by allowing some of those things to wait until Sunday.

It’s worth noting that God did not rest at the end of creation because He was tired. Isaiah tells us, “the Creator of the ends of the earth neither faints nor is weary” (Isaiah 40:28). A trap that many well-meaning Sabbath-keepers fall into is burning the candle at both ends all week and then collapsing in exhaustion on Sabbath afternoons! Perhaps we would benefit even more from Sabbath if we maintained a Sabbath-rest mentality all week long, getting adequate rest each day so that we could more fully enjoy the benefit of fellowship with our Creator and fellow believers on the seventh day. This Sabbath-rest lifestyle likewise demonstrates our trust in God’s ability to provide for our material needs.

In Leviticus 23:3, God told the Israelites that Sabbath was “a day of sacred assembly.” Both Jesus (Luke 4:16) and the apostles (Acts 13:13, 14; 13:42-44; 16:13; 17:2; 18:4) made a habit of going to the synagogue or worshiping together on Sabbath. Church is an opportunity to worship God in a place designed for worship, to learn more of Him through the study of His Word, and to receive encouragement from a community of fellow believers. Paul exhorted, “Let us not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but let us encourage one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching” (Hebrews 10:25).

Like the Pharisees, some have made modern lists of Sabbath do’s and don’ts. And let’s be honest: A list is very attractive because then we don’t have to think anymore! Not only that, but the stricter my list, the more self-righteous I can feel when I compare it to yours. Additionally, it’s tempting to draw conclusions about Sabbath observance and say, “This is the way I’ll do it forever.” Again, I don’t have to think about it anymore. But God gave us the capacity to think and reason, and we should always be doing so, striving to learn more of His will.

When it comes to Sabbath observance, do what God tells you to do. Seek a personal relationship with Him and take care that you don’t fall mindlessly into habit and cultural traditions.

A final word on Sabbath observance: Because the Bible’s instructions on how to keep the Sabbath holy are just a little bit “gray,” your neighbor’s understanding may be different than yours. I bet you don’t want him forcing his understanding on you. “So in everything, do to others as you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets” (Matthew 7:12). Love your neighbor, encourage him in his walk with our Creator, and trust that God speaks to his heart just like He speaks to yours.

https://www.sabbathtruth.com/free-resources/article-library/id/919/how-should-i-honor-it
 





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Christ, in fulfilling the moral law, abolished it.

It has been said that Christ, in fulfilling the moral law, actually abolished the Ten Commandments. However, let's take a look at what Jesus actually says in Matthew 5:17–19:
Any Born again believer knows that Christ did not abolish The Law, but did away with the penalty of the Law who receive Christ as their righteousness by His work upon the Cross. You can not tell someone to love somebody and they instantly love someone. The kind of love Christ talks about is described in 1 Corinthians Chapter 13....It comes from being born again, And you can not be born again until you see what man is as God describes him in Gen. 6:5-7 and Rom. 3:10-20. Then, and only then can you see God's grace in Jesus Christ. Without the Supernatural indwelling Spirit in the believer, you are playing church.