This is what Islam is...

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my latest findings....officially proved now by myself...

The truth is that muslims are worshipping the ANNUNAKI and the SPHINX which is in Egypt.

I can now prove this fact.

ALLAH

A = Alef

L - SEEN

L = SEEN

A = ALEF

H = DAAL

The above equations spell ASSAD exactley..

ASSAD in Arabic spells LION

LION refers to the SPHINX

The SPHINX is way older than the pyramids and is said to be from the Age of Leo.

Some say the SPHINX is a statue of a female and was painted red and black
 





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Clever! Try pronouncing it (the name of God). There are no vowels, only consonants, even in Hebrew. English speakers have a go with such variations as Jehovah and Yahweh, but that, the addition of vowels, is not found in the Tetragrammaton, so it seems a guess on anybody's part. Apart from the above-linked article, I think the Bible -or maybe it was Josephus- records that the Jewish high priest, once a year during Yom Kippur, when he would enter the Holy of Holies with adequate sacrificial blood, would pronounce it, so evidently he knew how, but it's been awhile since I have read that part.

With that said, maybe the author of Rumplestiltskin was aware of the taboos which often surround mentioning God's name in some circles and was playing on that? I know that Jews and others will often simply say "Hashem," which means "the name" without actually pronouncing it, and will even put a hyphen in the word, God, making it G-d.
True, in the OT alone there's YHWH, HaShem, El Shaddai, Adonai, Ehyeh asher ehyeh, Atik yomin......and this is aside from the NT's words for it. Most of these alone are just Hebrew words, not counting names for God in every other language from other cultures.
 





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Islam is the worship of the ANNUNAKI

Islam is the worship of the one EYE

Islam is the worship of HORUS

Islam is the worship of the pineal gland

Islam is the worship of AS ABOVE SO DOWN BELOW
In all honesty, this is one of the more appreciative crazy theories I've read, as I'm well aquainted with occultism and some of the Babylonian/Sumerian/Mesopotamian stuff.
The closest two things here are the pineal gland and as above so below. Now the default Islamic prayer and meditative practices are rather a slow-burn than anything direct for pineal gland activation, if you want to get that out of Islam, you need to enhance the actual prayer methods to something a little more extreme. There are aspects of Salaah which have some potentiality but in general, this is more an area where Sufis provide more useful methods, as the mainstream Salaah is aimed at closeness to the divine, a deep internalization of the unity of God.
The as above so below part, for the fact that the central and most important doctrine of Islam, the Tawhid (Unity of God) literally does mean logically that nothing is separate from God (but not that all are equal, no). Aside from the concept of divine closeness (Tashbih) and divine transcendence (Tanzih), of which Allah is both (Surah 57:3). Aside from this, in the very first Surah revealed to Prophet Muhammad, there is the two lines "Nay, but man doth transgress all bounds, In that he looketh upon himself as self-sufficient." (Surah 96:6-7). It's important to keep in mind. As you might know, the axiomatic formula "As above so below" comes out of Hermeticism and many Muslim philosophers throughout history have had the tendency to see Hermes Trismegistus as Prophet Idris (Enoch), this being a massive correlation between doctrines, fundamentally both Hermeticism and Islam are both horizontal theologies, not vertical, where God is the center of all, not something conceived of being 'above' in a literal sense, rather being the all-pervading source.
 





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True, in the OT alone there's YHWH, HaShem, El Shaddai, Adonai, Ehyeh asher ehyeh, Atik yomin......and this is aside from the NT's words for it. Most of these alone are just Hebrew words, not counting names for God in every other language from other cultures.
Welcome to the discussions! I am enjoying your contributions, and not just because you agreed with me :cool:. It might also be worth noting that, even within the OT itself, there seems to be a sort of progression, or gradual "revelation" of the unpronounceable name:

"I appeared to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob with [the name] Almighty God, but [with] My name YHWH, I did not become known to them."
(Shemot/Exodus 6:3)

A question, then, to my mind arises: if Abraham did not know "the Tetragrammaton," or four-letter name of God, why would his son, Ishmael, and even his later progeny, including Muhammad, be expected to know it?
 





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Welcome to the discussions! I am enjoying your contributions, and not just because you agreed with me :cool:. It might also be worth noting that, even within the OT itself, there seems to be a sort of progression, or gradual "revelation" of the unpronounceable name:

"I appeared to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob with [the name] Almighty God, but [with] My name YHWH, I did not become known to them."


A question, then, to my mind arises: if Abraham did not know "the Tetragrammaton," or four-letter name of God, why would his son, Ishmael, and even his later progeny, including Muhammad, be expected to know it?
Why thank you brother Serveto :D

Your question is definitely intriguing, given the ways in which the three Abrahamic religions see this topic. Obviously Judaism places the Tetragrammaton in central importance and holiness to the point of devising a way of 'speaking around' the four letters (such as the common name "HaShem"), Christianity commonly tends to put the Tetragrammaton into a role of lesser importance (and of course with the Trinitarian doctrine, referring to "The Father" instead of the OT name), whereas in Islam we've got another name again (although there are etymological connections, to some degree, although not immediately apparent) having no historical (since the Revelation of Islam) associations with the Tetragrammaton (yes we've interacted with Jews but I don't mean in that way).

Between the three religions it's easy to see how it could be an area of tense frustration, although I don't think it's really been often a source of controversy even though in the most exclusivist areas of the three Abrahamic religions you will still encounter "x worships a different 'god' from y".

As far as the Prophets in their flesh-and-blood historical selves, well going by the Pentateuch for a moment; I don't really think it's very likely that most of the Prophets recorded in the book of Genesis spoke any Hebrew even (let alone Aramaic, Greek, Arabic, etc), the further you go back the more ridiculous it becomes to expect as such and whatever language Prophet Adam spoke for instance is gonna be completely unrecognizable to all anthropological linguistics. It is likely, from both what we do have, that all true divine utterances (and in reference to the self-affirmation of God through Revelation and Angels) will share phonetic similarities across any number of cultures. It's definitely quite a big topic though.
 





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It's definitely quite a big topic though.
That it is. Though I was raised in the Christian (Protestant) tradition, the occasional, arm-chair, amateur Taoist in me understands the idea that motivated and underlies the clearly paradoxical axiom that "The Tao which can be spoken of [to say nothing of named] is not The Tao." I think this idea is somewhat analogous to the Kabbalist notion of "Ain Soph," the highest Sephirot, which can be neither known nor named, except by saying what it is not.

I also think Sir James Fraser and others have done their homework to show that a preoccupation not only with identifying but then wielding the power of the names of the demigods either originated in Egyptian ceremonial magic or was in any case commonly practiced by Egyptian magicians. Whether or not and to what extent the OT, especially, is influenced by Egyptian magical rites and practices is, to me, an open-ended, academic question, keeping in mind not only that Moses and the Israelites are said to have made their physical exodus from Egypt, but also "borrowed," or would it be despoiled, the Egyptians of their gold, silver, etc., upon departure. On the other hand, the reverse could also be true: Egyptian magic was, and its modern derivatives are, an inversion and perversion of the ostensibly purified henotheism monotheism of the Israelites.

Anyway, it's nice conversing with you. Sometimes, though not invariably, this sub-forum is characterized more by inter-faith polemics than dialog.
 





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That it is. Though I was raised in the Christian (Protestant) tradition, the occasional, arm-chair, amateur Taoist in me understands the idea that motivated and underlies the clearly paradoxical axiom that "The Tao which can be spoken of [to say nothing of named] is not The Tao." I think this idea is somewhat analogous to the Kabbalist notion of "Ain Soph," the highest Sephirot, which can be neither known nor named, except by saying what it is not.
Yep, I've made this connection myself before. Taking "the Bible through the Bible", I think it's inevitable to any deep-thinking person that they'll realize that theophanies of God in the OT are not synonymous with what God IS in it's Absoluteness. The kabbalistic notion of Ain Soph flows directly into what the OT is actually alluding to in many places, truly.
And yes, the concept of Tao/Dao is referenced in comparative religion often for good reason. Tao, Brahman, Ain Soph, Tawhid, "The Father".
(Taoism is really great btw, some incredible stuff has come out of that tradition, aside from the two core texts and the I-ching)

When it comes to Islam, Surah 112 is the most important four lines in our entire religion and they're incredibly deep, incredibly profound. Surah 112:4 in particular, with the very strong notion that one cannot take lightly, that: "There is nothing like God".
There are also several amazing ahadith that expand on that profound Surah. But Surah 112 is not something you just read one-off, it's something that we Muslims spend our lives reflecting on and of course reciting in daily prayer.
Many things in all three Abrahamic religions have made me quite certain over time that some form of Apophatic theology is quite certainly the only way you can go, seeing that God is Creator, not Creation. (although I don't think all expressions I've seen of Apophatic theology 'get it', which is a shame)

I also think Sir James Fraser and others have done their homework to show that a preoccupation not only with identifying but then wielding the power of the names of the demigods either originated in Egyptian ceremonial magic or was in any case commonly practiced by Egyptian magicians. Whether or not and to what extent the OT, especially, is influenced by Egyptian magical rites and practices is, to me, an open-ended, academic question, keeping in mind not only that Moses and the Israelites are said to have made their physical exodus from Egypt, but also "borrowed," or would it be despoiled, the Egyptians of their gold, silver, etc., upon departure. On the other hand, the reverse could also be true: Egyptian magic was, and its modern derivatives are, an inversion and perversion of the ostensibly purified henotheism monotheism of the Israelites.
Depends which side you give more credence to, as the Abrahamic tradition has the underlying notion of cyclical Revelation reoccuring from since the beginning of prehistory. The ancient Egyptian religion and culture is definitely quite interesting though and there is definitely a reason why it has endured interest throughout history (literally pick a random tradition of Occultism) despite it's original practice going defunct.
Aside from this, we tend to make assumptions about ancient 'polytheism' which may just not be true. In many cases it seems to be more like glorified saint-worship or the deification of rulers, possibly of Prophets too.

Anyway, it's nice conversing with you. Sometimes, though not invariably, this sub-forum is characterized more by inter-faith polemics than dialog.
You're welcome, yeah that kind of stuff just makes me roll my eyes. ;)
 





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