The Fantasy/Scifi and other associated genres discussion thread

amaranthine

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Starting the thread because we were going way off-topic on that Tolkien Society goes woke thread.
Post your favorites, discuss the themes, characters and everything around these lovely genres of books.

Let me start.
Anyone read anything by John Crowley? His works have been the last books I read from the fantasy genre. They are usually very mysterious and his language is gorgeous. Sometimes his plot threads tend to be on the obscure side, maybe even slightly unpolished (perhaps some editing would not be out of place), but he always pulls you into the world of his characters and the world he paints seems alive. I most love the subtlety of the stories themselves, they do not revolve around saving the world, big battles (although there is a definite place for those kinds of books in fantasy), but around problems that characters face in themselves and their attitude towards the world. Little, Big is a lovely book (in a way it has a similar vibe to Susana Clark's "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell") and so is Aegypt ( I have only read the first part as the others are still out of print, darn it). Currently reading his "Ka: Dar Oakley in the Ruin of Ymr" - I am loving it, even the title drew me in.
 






Maes17

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Does it have to be book? Can it be other forms of media like say video games or movies.

For sci-fi. I do enjoy the matrix trilogy.
I also got back into borderlands as far as gaming. Just something to get away from working out and my downtime from the wife and kiddos
 






Cintra

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OMG!
John Crowley - Little, big.
I want to live on Old Law Farm!

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
A huge favourite book for me.

Anyone ever read 'Song for Arbourne' by Guy Gavriel Kaye?
It is kind of lovely, but I didn't like his other books so much.

Did anyone else have a huge Pern thing until her son took over?

I loved Zelazney's Amber, but I was very young when I first read them. I read them again a few years ago. They seemed a bit cheesey.
 






Drifter

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Apr 15, 2021
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Starting the thread because we were going way off-topic on that Tolkien Society goes woke thread.
Post your favorites, discuss the themes, characters and everything around these lovely genres of books.

Let me start.
Anyone read anything by John Crowley? His works have been the last books I read from the fantasy genre. They are usually very mysterious and his language is gorgeous. Sometimes his plot threads tend to be on the obscure side, maybe even slightly unpolished (perhaps some editing would not be out of place), but he always pulls you into the world of his characters and the world he paints seems alive. I most love the subtlety of the stories themselves, they do not revolve around saving the world, big battles (although there is a definite place for those kinds of books in fantasy), but around problems that characters face in themselves and their attitude towards the world. Little, Big is a lovely book (in a way it has a similar vibe to Susana Clark's "Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell") and so is Aegypt ( I have only read the first part as the others are still out of print, darn it). Currently reading his "Ka: Dar Oakley in the Ruin of Ymr" - I am loving it, even the title drew me in.
I've yet to start on any of his novels but I do have a copy of Novelties and Souvenirs. Not strictly fantasy but still really good. Much to chew on, lots of erudite philosophical takes couched in gorgeous prose and from what I remember, The Nightigale Sings at Night and The War Between Objects and the Subects were my favorites (but I'm itching to reread it). I've only heard good things about Little, Big. My TBR list is ever growing but I'm pretty exited haha.
 






Cintra

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@weskrongden

Come and explain the towers and the colours to me, please.

I have never heard about it before and I want to know more
 






AmazingGrace

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Jan 23, 2021
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The Expanse is one of the best and most enjoyable tv series I've ever seen. Based on books, written by two authors in the same way Song of Ice and Fire is written (each chapter is from perspective of a different character and you start to see whole picture of the story only later), well written interesting characters, very realistic up to details (physics - passengers of spaceships affected by acceleration, fast maneuvers and multiple Gs, problems with logistics like food, water, air, recycling), politics, mad scientists, tactics, space battles and a mysterious disease from outer space.

 






Journeyman

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Jack Vance was a brilliant writer. Tales of the Dying Earth were a favourite. Earthsea also brilliant.
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, about the closest to Tolkien in terms of world building.
Mary Gentle's 'The White Crow' was an interesting take on the genre.
There's a lot of very average fantasy books out there though.
 






Cintra

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Jack Vance was a brilliant writer. Tales of the Dying Earth were a favourite. Earthsea also brilliant.
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, about the closest to Tolkien in terms of world building.
Mary Gentle's 'The White Crow' was an interesting take on the genre.
There's a lot of very average fantasy books out there though.
White Crow!
The one with the rats!!!
I love that!
 






Maldarker

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Mar 23, 2021
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The Expanse is one of the best and most enjoyable tv series I've ever seen. Based on books, written by two authors in the same way Song of Ice and Fire is written (each chapter is from perspective of a different character and you start to see whole picture of the story only later), well written interesting characters, very realistic up to details (physics - passengers of spaceships affected by acceleration, fast maneuvers and multiple Gs, problems with logistics like food, water, air, recycling), politics, mad scientists, tactics, space battles and a mysterious disease from outer space.

I do what to start watching this heard its really good.
 






Maldarker

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For a newer author Lev Grossman The magicians trilogy


For an older read been around since late 70's
Stephen R. Donaldson
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant

And Piers Anthony specifically the Incarnations Of Immortality Books - Apprentice Adept Books - Xanth Books
 






Last edited:

Tidal

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An LOTR trick question- Which individual saved Middle Earth?
 






Cintra

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I looked it up.

Tidal will say Pippin, because he inadvertently saved Frodo from the orcs at the breaking of the fellowship.

You could equally say anyone who saved Frodo.

Tom Bombadil?
 






Maldarker

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I looked it up.

Tidal will say Pippin, because he inadvertently saved Frodo from the orcs at the breaking of the fellowship.

You could equally say anyone who saved Frodo.

Tom Bombadil?
Yeah but that's an easy out LOL.
 






Cintra

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@Tidal

You said it was a trick question.
Did I get it right?

Shelob saved middle earth because she didn't kill gollum in minas mogul.
So that he could take the ring to the fire.
 






Journeyman

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Bilbo, he could've killed Gollum in their encounter under the misty mountains, but he took pity on him.

Gandalf references it later when someone (Frodo?) wishes Bilbo had killed him when he had the chance.

Of course there's other key moments one could pick, but I think Tolkien puts a lot of emphasis on the hobbit's fundamental decency and when Gollum bites the ring and takes it into the fire that act of mercy ultimately saves Frodo and middle earth
 






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