The C.S Lewis Thread

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#42
I suspect a lot of the confusion is due to many people forgetting to not take C.S.Lewis' fictional books literally at all.
For people who not able to do that (for whatever reason), perhaps they should avoid his works and look for more obviously mainstream-Christian theology-friendly novels instead?
why not the bible? I know people like to supplement their reading but honestly we have to be careful. C.S. Lewis is a false prophet, and he blasphemes God (jesus = pagan deity aslan, this masonic pattern of duality black and white being one, c'mon we all know this occult tendency), placing many pitfalls (occult references that are used and inspire witches in training). Like why would one want to use witchcraft as imagery (even if its fiction) to point towards Christ? God detests magic and witchcraft, why would he want you to read and imagine things related to the occult? (Especially when we have the real thing, the Word of God in our hands?) This is pure evil, and its not just innocuous imagination.

And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.
-Ephesians 5:11

C.S. Lewis is also a member of the Golden Dawn and hung out with fellow highly-esteemed occult members, calling people like charles williams and owen barfield his "dearest friends".

https://harrypotterpower.com/lewis.html
http://www.crossroad.to/heaven/Excerpts/books/lewis/inklings-williams.htm
 





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#43
why not the bible? I know people like to supplement their reading but honestly we have to be careful. C.S. Lewis is a false prophet, and he blasphemes God (jesus = pagan deity aslan, this masonic pattern of duality black and white being one, c'mon we all know this occult tendency), placing many pitfalls (occult references that are used and inspire witches in training). Like why would one want to use witchcraft as imagery (even if its fiction) to point towards Christ? God detests magic and witchcraft, why would he want you to read and imagine things related to the occult? (Especially when we have the real thing, the Word of God in our hands?) This is pure evil, and its not just innocuous imagination.

And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.
-Ephesians 5:11

C.S. Lewis is also a member of the Golden Dawn and hung out with fellow highly-esteemed occult members, calling people like charles williams and owen barfield his "dearest friends".

https://harrypotterpower.com/lewis.html
http://www.crossroad.to/heaven/Excerpts/books/lewis/inklings-williams.htm
In terms of my faith, I don't base it on any extra-biblical materials or even writers I like a lot. One thing I became aware of is that many people are led by both their imagination and their theology.

I don't intend any offence here - perhaps you don't read anything but the Bible, avoid film and music and shun books that are not overtly Christian. If that's where you're at, you have truly separated yourself from the world and might even be better off personally for doing so.

Back to Lewis and his circle of friends, a "dear friend" and colleague of mine at University was also an occultist. I liked him as a person regardless, and also because I felt the love God had for him despite his liking for Crowley. I had no sympathies for his persuit of the "hidden" whatsoever.

When Paul stood up on Mars Hill, addressing the Greeks who were always after some new thing, Paul entered their world of imagination and connected with the stories they held dear.

Acts 17

27 That they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him, and find him, though he be not far from every one of us:

28 For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.
 





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#44
why not the bible? I know people like to supplement their reading but honestly we have to be careful. C.S. Lewis is a false prophet, and he blasphemes God (jesus = pagan deity aslan, this masonic pattern of duality black and white being one, c'mon we all know this occult tendency), placing many pitfalls (occult references that are used and inspire witches in training). Like why would one want to use witchcraft as imagery (even if its fiction) to point towards Christ? God detests magic and witchcraft, why would he want you to read and imagine things related to the occult? (Especially when we have the real thing, the Word of God in our hands?) This is pure evil, and its not just innocuous imagination.

And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.
-Ephesians 5:11

C.S. Lewis is also a member of the Golden Dawn and hung out with fellow highly-esteemed occult members, calling people like charles williams and owen barfield his "dearest friends".

https://harrypotterpower.com/lewis.html
http://www.crossroad.to/heaven/Excerpts/books/lewis/inklings-williams.htm
You are right, I should have made myself clearer. For books OTHER than the bible, assuming that the Christian is using the bible for their "daily bread". I have come to your viewpoint after many years of permitting myself to read anything that caught my curiousity. The vast majority of readers do absorb an author's worldview if they read them enough.

I don't read fiction very much any more. I am even careful with any Christian NON-fiction books/ websites as I do not want to be misled by non-biblical teachings or waste my time on mindless fluff from TV evangeli$ts.
It is a matter of conscience.
 





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#45
I enjoyed "That Hideous Strength" - third one in his space trilogy.

I was just reading an article on some of the themes he develops is the story. I was quite surprised to read that this was one of his less well known books as it was also perhaps one of my favourite!

I totally get that his writing is not to everyone's liking, but it was to mine. Anyway, for those who see things in a similar light to myself, you may find this article interesting:-

"C. S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength is often regarded as one of his most bizarre and unwieldy books. There are very few studies of it, and those that do exist tend to focus on its central social critique, leaving its ancillary theological and philosophical themes largely unexplored. This article examines the motif of conversion in That Hideous Strength. It traces out the contrasting conversion narratives of Mark and Jane Studdock, situates them in relation to the larger social message of the novel, and then draws two applications for what we can learn about evangelism today from this book."

Continues...

http://themelios.thegospelcoalition.org/article/conversion-in-c-s-lewis-that-hideous-strength
 





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#46
In terms of my faith, I don't base it on any extra-biblical materials or even writers I like a lot. One thing I became aware of is that many people are led by both their imagination and their theology.

I don't intend any offence here - perhaps you don't read anything but the Bible, avoid film and music and shun books that are not overtly Christian. If that's where you're at, you have truly separated yourself from the world and might even be better off personally for doing so.

Back to Lewis and his circle of friends, a "dear friend" and colleague of mine at University was also an occultist. I liked him as a person regardless, and also because I felt the love God had for him despite his liking for Crowley. I had no sympathies for his persuit of the "hidden" whatsoever.

When Paul stood up on Mars Hill, addressing the Greeks who were always after some new thing, Paul entered their world of imagination and connected with the stories they held dear.

Acts 17

27 That they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him, and find him, though he be not far from every one of us:

28 For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.
I'm sorry, but if you believe everything and still don't feel convicted to stop reading the occult writings of C.S. Lewis, I would like to lovingly rebuke you and ask that you please reconsider. We all know who Crowley is- he was an outright hedonist and the Father of Satanism- how can you say that one could still love God and admire Crowley?

Please brother, this is not just a matter of entertainment or pastime- what one consumes also dictates his or her soul and spirit. If you have the Holy Spirit inside of you, then you would know that the Temple of God (your body that houses the spirit of God) cannot dwell among the likes of evil spirits or witchcraft or the demons of worldly entertainment.

22 The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light.

23 But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in thee be darkness, how great is that darkness!
-------------------------
5 Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.

16 Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?

17 Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit.

18 A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.

19 Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.

20 Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them.

I would urge you to read Matthew 6 and 7.


21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.

22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?

23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.
 





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#47
I'm sorry, but if you believe everything and still don't feel convicted to stop reading the occult writings of C.S. Lewis, I would like to lovingly rebuke you and ask that you please reconsider. We all know who Crowley is- he was an outright hedonist and the Father of Satanism- how can you say that one could still love God and admire Crowley?

Please brother, this is not just a matter of entertainment or pastime- what one consumes also dictates his or her soul and spirit. If you have the Holy Spirit inside of you, then you would know that the Temple of God (your body that houses the spirit of God) cannot dwell among the likes of evil spirits or witchcraft or the demons of worldly entertainment.

22 The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light.

23 But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in thee be darkness, how great is that darkness!
-------------------------
5 Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.

16 Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?

17 Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit.

18 A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.

19 Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.

20 Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them.

I would urge you to read Matthew 6 and 7.


21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.

22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?

23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.
I think you're a little off base. Clive Lewis never claimed to be a prophet. He was a writer, academic, and a simple Chrisitian. Here at VC I'm sure we can all agree to be conscious of of what we take in through mass media, to question every source and their viewpoint. But on a scale of abominable deeds done to mankind Lewis is fairly harmless. Transexuals like Disney and Jim Henson were more deplorable in my opinion. Look at the world banking system or elitist think tanks like the CFR- much more sinister and worthy of destruction.

There is a place for artists, scientists, dreamers, etc. Their conflict brings something of value to us all.They are crying for attention, and I don't mind listening sometimes (if they aren't overly hedonistic). Christ didn't travel from place to place condemning common folk. He battled the proud, arrogant, hypocritical loudmouths who judged others falsely. His enemy were the church priests, not the sufferers.
 





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#49
Saw this and immediately thought of you RSAM..or should I say, Dr. Owen? :cool:

I watched this with some interest...

I seem to have inexplicably come across much of the academic training to tease out the various strands of the presentation you posted up. I can't promise a short answer to such a complex proposition but hopefully I can provide a good one (and tie it into this thread as well).

@priemier rightly noted some of the dangers inherent in elevating certain authors as being particularly authoritative or exemplary. I grew up on C.S. Lewis and Tolkien. In some ways they helped inspire within me a "Christian imagination" and in other ways might make me more forgiving of their doctrinal flaws. The risk from deception is rarely from those we reject and dislike. More often it comes from those we admire and trust. Unconsciously we open our hearts to ideas that they too hold to and in doing so we can blindly take on sympathies and ideas we might have just as well left alone.

Lewis and Tolkien both loved mythology and literature. I can understand because for many years I have felt the same way. Sometimes through myth, imagination and parable we connect with truths otherwise out of our reach. In the same way, experience and truth are synonymous for many people, "I know what I saw" says the lady who spotted the UFO.

However, does this truly bear examination?

Without having watched the talk you posted, some people may be in doubt about what I mean. In brief, Tolkein and Jung both had "red books" and "mythic archetypal" experiences from which their ideas seemed to flow, so the questions that occur to me immediately are these:-

Is everything that is "spiritual", involving foresight, visions or extreme emotion from the same source?

Are good people immune from deceptive experiences?

Do all experiences of the "beyond" arise from our collective consciousness or are they information from spiritual entities that may be either good beyond out comprehension or wicked beyond our imagination?
 





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#51
P.p.s. @DavidSon

I find it interesting that the belief system that was most authentically expressed through Jung's archetypes was Manichaeism.

"Manichaeism taught an elaborate dualistic cosmology describing the struggle between a good, spiritual world of light, and an evil, material world of darkness. Through an ongoing process that takes place in human history, light is gradually removed from the world of matter and returned to the world of light, whence it came. Its beliefs were based on local Mesopotamian religious movements and Gnosticism."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manichaeism
 





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#52
I watched this with some interest...

I seem to have explicably come across much of the academic training to tease out the various strands of the presentation you posted up. I can't promise a short answer to such a complex proposition but hopefully I can provide a good one (and tie it into this thread as well).

@priemier rightly noted some of the dangers inherent in elevating certain authors as being particularly authoritative or exemplary. I grew up on C.S. Lewis and Tolkien. In some ways they helped inspire within me a "Christian imagination" and in other ways might make me more forgiving of their doctrinal flaws. The risk from deception is rarely from those we reject and dislike. More often it comes from those we admire and trust. Unconsciously we open our hearts to ideas that they too hold to and in doing so we can blindly take on sympathies and ideas we might have just as well left alone.

Lewis and Tolkien both loved mythology and literature. I can understand because for many years I have felt the same way. Sometimes through myth, imagination and parable we connect with truths otherwise out of our reach. In the same way, experience and truth are synonymous for many people, "I know what I saw" says the lady who spotted the UFO.

However, does this truly bear examination?

Without having watched the talk you posted, some people may be in doubt about what I mean. In brief, Tolkein and Jung both had "red books" and "mythic archetypal" experiences from which their ideas seemed to flow, so the questions that occur to me immediately are these:-

Is everything that is "spiritual", involving foresight, visions or extreme emotion from the same source?

Are good people immune from deceptive experiences?

Do all experiences of the "beyond" arise from our collective consciousness or are they information from spiritual entities that may be either good beyond out comprehension or wicked beyond our imagination?
A short Christian analysis of Jung: http://www.pamweb.org/jungleg.html