Sobriety Support Thread aka The VC Anonymous Group

Vulpesrex

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Jun 8, 2019
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83
I'm creating this thread with the intention of it functioning akin to an Anonymous meeting (AA, NA, etc)

Maybe you live in a small town and are afraid to go to meetings because people like to gossip. Or you don't want to commit to the 12 steps. Or you don't feel comfortable getting up in front of a bunch of people and talking about the dumb stuff you did on your latest spill off the wagon. Or you're dealing with depression from withdrawals and are not leaving your bed today, let alone the house to go to a meeting. Or you want to talk about some supernatural experiences you've had with like-minded folks who won't automatically assume you're schizophrenic, since I, and some of our other members, do believe altering your consciousness with substances can open a door to the Other Side...I've seen some shit, too, maaaan.

Come here instead. Weather you're trying to be sober forever or just need to check yourself a bit before you wreck yourself. All are welcome. :)

I quit drinking this February after years of getting hammered almost every day for well over a decade. The only days I didn't drink were the days I was too hungover to function. Had a few slip ups since but otherwise doing surpisingly well. Some days are easy, many days are a nightmare.
More recently, I quit smoking weed because I'm going for a new job and will need to pass my initial drug test and future random ones. Quitting pot is a struggle in it's own, unique ways....its been almost ritualistic for me to smoke after work to relax, unwind and "reward" myself after a hard day's work. I haven't yet found a new way to "reward" myself yet to try and reprogram that behavior aspect (suggestions welcome). Also, I cut ties with 90% of my friends/acquaintances so as to avoid tempting situations...realizing how much of adult life revolves around drinking or is actually a thinly-veiled excuse to drink (insert bad joke about golfing here) was pretty-eye opening and honestly sad. The loneliness is real...probably one of the reasons I've been more active on here lately tbh. Complete sobriety is one of the hardest things I've ever done but I know it'll be more than worth it for this job and a better future for myself.
 






Last edited:

Daze

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Jun 28, 2020
Messages
601
I quit drinking this February after years of getting hammered almost every day for well over a decade.
Congrats, a journey of a 1000 miles begins with the first step. Seems like you're well on your way.

I've never been an alcoholic, but I had a tobacco addiction i struggled with for 16 years... finally kicked it for good on Sep 3, 2013.
I tried quitting well over 100 times, in the end it was knowledge that helped me. Educating myself on the drug, its affects, knowing what to expect, ect ect.. Anyway, just saying i know what an addiction is and how hard the struggles can be.

It will get easier. I haven't thought about a cigarette in years, i can be around smokers and it doesn't bother me in the least. If you hang with it you'll get stronger as well. The drug will lose its grip, mentally and physically.


Work on your relationship with the Almighty, and all of your trials will become easier. It is the remebrance of the Creator where the heart finds rest.
 






Johnny5

Veteran
Joined
Jun 20, 2019
Messages
567
I'm creating this thread with the intention of it functioning akin to an Anonymous meeting (AA, NA, etc)

Maybe you live in a small town and are afraid to go to meetings because people like to gossip. Or you don't want to commit to the 12 steps. Or you don't feel comfortable getting up in front of a bunch of people and talking about the dumb stuff you did on your latest spill off the wagon. Or you're dealing with depression from withdrawals and are not leaving your bed today, let alone the house to go to a meeting. Or you want to talk about some supernatural experiences you've had with like-minded folks who won't automatically assume you're schizophrenic, since I, and some of our other members, do believe altering your consciousness with substances can open a door to the Other Side...I've seen some shit, too, maaaan.

Come here instead. Weather you're trying to be sober forever or just need to check yourself a bit before you wreck yourself. All are welcome. :)

I quit drinking this February after years of getting hammered almost every day for well over a decade. The only days I didn't drink were the days I was too hungover to function. Had a few slip ups since but otherwise doing surpisingly well. Some days are easy, many days are a nightmare.
More recently, I quit smoking weed because I'm going for a new job and will need to pass my initial drug test and future random ones. Quitting pot is a struggle in it's own, unique ways....its been almost ritualistic for me to smoke after work to relax, unwind and "reward" myself after a hard day's work. I haven't yet found a new way to "reward" myself yet to try and reprogram that behavior aspect (suggestions welcome). Also, I cut ties with 90% of my friends/acquaintances so as to avoid tempting situations...realizing how much of adult life revolves around drinking or is actually a thinly-veiled excuse to drink (insert bad joke about golfing here) was pretty-eye opening and honestly sad. The loneliness is real...probably one of the reasons I've been more active on here lately tbh. Complete sobriety is one of the hardest things I've ever done but I know it'll be more than worth it for this job and a better future for myself.
I commend you on your decision. That is really impressive on so many levels!!! It can be extremely difficult, but with time it may become easier. I know the steps you took to change relationships and social habits can be hard, but will probably help you quite a bit. I had tobacco addiction for over 20 years and quit about 4 years ago. It was smokeless tobacco so I could get away with doing it pretty much anywhere which made it some what difficult to quit. I had become the type of user that as soon as I woke up, I'd partake then used almost every other hour each day. Changing your routine and habits is helpful. Please know that you are not alone and you have others you can reach out to for advice. Mostly important I think is to look and prayer for God's help in those rough times.
 






Tubby Walters

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Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
35
I'm currently on a sobriety mission as well as nicotine cleanse as well. Its undoubtedly hard, especially nicotine. Hookah and vaping have been my enemies.

Alcohol has gotten easier to avoid but yes, friendships are put on hold, especially if you have friends who only hang out when hookah and alcohol are involved.

And both are such a money killer.

Anyways, here's to the battle! May we all help each other.
 






LkMTM

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Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
17
I'm currently on a sobriety mission as well as nicotine cleanse as well. Its undoubtedly hard, especially nicotine. Hookah and vaping have been my enemies.

Alcohol has gotten easier to avoid but yes, friendships are put on hold, especially if you have friends who only hang out when hookah and alcohol are involved.

And both are such a money killer.

Anyways, here's to the battle! May we all help each other.
In regard to the nicotine addiction, what have you found that helps you, if anything?

I was a binge drinker for 4 years.
Quite cold turkey in 2017. Haven’t had a craving for alcohol since.

It’s all mind and willpower. Surround yourself with people who support your goals
Out of curiosity, and if you don't mind answering, where do you stand with alcohol now? You said you don't have that craving, but do you ever still drink? If so, do you have a beer with dinner, do you catch a nice buzz and enjoy the game, do you sometimes still get nice and drunk? As examples


Sorry, now for the about me. My family on my mothers side comes from a long history of alcohlism and alcohol abuse. I started drinking fairly young. Did the daily binge for about 3 and a half years. Tried changing a few times off and on, each time I fell back into it though. That went another 2 years or so. This last time though, i didn't have a drop for about 5 months, when my best prior was 2. Of course, as you can tell I am off the wagon, but I feel that I'm still walking alongside it in a way. Even though I still drink, it is not like it has been before. I am more concious. I dont binge, i try not to drink more than 2 nights in a row, but if I do the third night is the last. Then I will give it a break for the week, or sometimes only a break until the weekend. I dont get smashed or hammered, more of a catch a buzz and enjoy the game, per my examples above. Been holding steady with that for 8 months since I fell off from my 5 months totally sober. Next month is my 2 year for quitting smoking. I only quit by picking up vaping though, and I have been climbing up and down, then up again then down the ladder with my nicotine content in my vape juice. The nicotine addiction in my opinion, is not the greater, but stronger of the two, if that makes sense. I hope to be totally done with it someday. Done with both. The will is there.. For me i think its just a matter of time.
Getting away from my mother and that side, and meeting the woman I did is what has helped me.


Edits: details
 






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Maes17

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Joined
Jul 27, 2017
Messages
5,084
In regard to the nicotine addiction, what have you found that helps you, if anything?



Out of curiosity, and if you don't mind answering, where do you stand with alcohol now? You said you don't have that craving, but do you ever still drink? If so, do you have a beer with dinner, do you catch a nice buzz and enjoy the game, do you sometimes still get nice and drunk? As examples


Sorry, now for the about me. My family on my mothers side comes from a long history of alcohlism and alcohol abuse. I started drinking fairly young. Did the daily binge for about 3 and a half years. Tried changing a few times off and on, each time I fell back into it though. That went another 2 years or so. This last time though, i didn't have a drop for about 5 months, when my best prior was 2. Of course, as you can tell I am off the wagon, but I feel that I'm still walking alongside it in a way. Even though I still drink, it is not like it has been before. I am more concious. I dont binge, i try not to drink more than 2 nights in a row, but if I do the third night is the last. Then I will give it a break for the week, or sometimes only a break until the weekend. I dont get smashed or hammered, more of a catch a buzz and enjoy the game, per my examples above. Been holding steady with that for 8 months since I fell off from my 5 months totally sober. Next month is my 2 year for quitting smoking. I only quit by picking up vaping though, and I have been climbing up and down, then up again then down the ladder with my nicotine content in my vape juice. The nicotine addiction in my opinion, is not the greater, but stronger of the two, if that makes sense. I hope to be totally done with it someday. Done with both. The will is there.. For me i think its just a matter of time.
Getting away from my mother and that side, and meeting the woman I did is what has helped me.


Edits: details
No alcohol at all for me. I don’t have a negative connotation towards it. At family get togethers my relatives drink which is fine. After binge drinking and seeing my dad nearly fall into a diabetic coma, I really had a wake up call with my health too. I want to see my kids grow up and not be a burden on my wife.

My dad’s side has a lot of alcoholics. Every family get together all my cousins drink and drink.

I drank fairly young too. When the wife and I were attending university, we were out of state students. I made friends who I would get drunk and in trouble with. My wife always bailed me out of sketchy situations. She was/is the mature one.
So I stay sober for her as she’s my inspiration
 






Tubby Walters

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Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
35
In regard to the nicotine addiction, what have you found that helps you, if anything?



Out of curiosity, and if you don't mind answering, where do you stand with alcohol now? You said you don't have that craving, but do you ever still drink? If so, do you have a beer with dinner, do you catch a nice buzz and enjoy the game, do you sometimes still get nice and drunk? As examples


Sorry, now for the about me. My family on my mothers side comes from a long history of alcohlism and alcohol abuse. I started drinking fairly young. Did the daily binge for about 3 and a half years. Tried changing a few times off and on, each time I fell back into it though. That went another 2 years or so. This last time though, i didn't have a drop for about 5 months, when my best prior was 2. Of course, as you can tell I am off the wagon, but I feel that I'm still walking alongside it in a way. Even though I still drink, it is not like it has been before. I am more concious. I dont binge, i try not to drink more than 2 nights in a row, but if I do the third night is the last. Then I will give it a break for the week, or sometimes only a break until the weekend. I dont get smashed or hammered, more of a catch a buzz and enjoy the game, per my examples above. Been holding steady with that for 8 months since I fell off from my 5 months totally sober. Next month is my 2 year for quitting smoking. I only quit by picking up vaping though, and I have been climbing up and down, then up again then down the ladder with my nicotine content in my vape juice. The nicotine addiction in my opinion, is not the greater, but stronger of the two, if that makes sense. I hope to be totally done with it someday. Done with both. The will is there.. For me i think its just a matter of time.
Getting away from my mother and that side, and meeting the woman I did is what has helped me.


Edits: details
Unfortunately I do not have a motivation for nicotine. Right now, I'm using finances as a motivator, though its hard. Im in very early stages though the outlook is good. Granted, my food intake has upped and one bad day at work could trigger a trip to the local hookah lounge but fortunately I have the next two days off to help. We shall see how it goes.
 






Tubby Walters

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Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
35
Unfortunately I do not have a motivation for nicotine. Right now, I'm using finances as a motivator, though its hard. Im in very early stages though the outlook is good. Granted, my food intake has upped and one bad day at work could trigger a trip to the local hookah lounge but fortunately I have the next two days off to help. We shall see how it goes.
A set motivation i mean lol. Its random over the amount of times I've tried to quit.
 






free2018

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Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
1,300
Unfortunately I do not have a motivation for nicotine. Right now, I'm using finances as a motivator, though its hard. Im in very early stages though the outlook is good. Granted, my food intake has upped and one bad day at work could trigger a trip to the local hookah lounge but fortunately I have the next two days off to help. We shall see how it goes.
Yeah, smoking is a tough one. I have quit a few times, but the only thing I like more than smoking is exercise. I don't smoke more than four a day and I only smoked two a day the last few years.
 






Vulpesrex

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Jun 8, 2019
Messages
83
Congrats, a journey of a 1000 miles begins with the first step. Seems like you're well on your way.

I've never been an alcoholic, but I had a tobacco addiction i struggled with for 16 years... finally kicked it for good on Sep 3, 2013.
I tried quitting well over 100 times, in the end it was knowledge that helped me. Educating myself on the drug, its affects, knowing what to expect, ect ect.. Anyway, just saying i know what an addiction is and how hard the struggles can be.

It will get easier. I haven't thought about a cigarette in years, i can be around smokers and it doesn't bother me in the least. If you hang with it you'll get stronger as well. The drug will lose its grip, mentally and physically.


Work on your relationship with the Almighty, and all of your trials will become easier. It is the remebrance of the Creator where the heart finds rest.
Thank you for your kind words, and congratulations to you for your own hard work on kicking your own addiction! /high-fives through computer/ That's amazing you can be around it and not be tempted or have it bother you - I have a colleague who's been sober off everything for 16 years as well and is able to be in social situations where people are drinking and have it not bother him the same way you've mentioned. He calls its a sort of "transcendence" and says I'll get there eventually, too.

For now, I've been avoiding work cocktail hours/networking meetups or finding excuses to duck out early if I absolutely must go to see a certain person I'm collaborating on a project with, because the temptation is too great. (Corona lockdown has lifted in my area, but people have to wear masks at public indoor places and aren't supposed to be in large groups, but the former is selectively enforced and the latter blatantly ignored in many cases.) The spiritual side of these issues intrigues me and I've found some answers there on our human condition and why we struggle with these issues in the first place. Edge of Wonder is doing a series on the spiritual side of addiction and it's been very eye-opening and helpful to me.
 






Tidal

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Mar 4, 2020
Messages
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My ex brother-in-law drank like a fish and smoked like a chimney and died of cancer in his mid-60's, so his wife has now got to struggle on alone into old age for the rest of her life.
The moral?- if any drinkers need motivation to give up, don't be like him, cut down a bit for the sake of your wife.
 






Tidal

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My dad was a workaholic- literally- and used to pour bottles of wine down his throat in the evenings to relieve his stress.
(My mother would whisper to me- "Look at him, he doesn't bother to enjoy the taste or anything, he just gulps it down")
He died of liver cancer in 1982 aged 62, leaving my mother alone for the final 17 years of her life.

My dads brother (my dear old uncle Bill) was an alcoholic and his mind finally packed up in his 50's up and he ended up deliriously ranting in hospital for a couple of weeks not knowing what planet he was on, until he mercifully died.

PS- I tried a few sips of booze and wine in my early teens (like kids do), but it all tasted like cat pee to me so I've never touched it since except when naughty women have tried to get me drunk at parties, and i've gone along with it to be a good sport.
As it took effect I noticed the earth's axis had took on a severe tilt and I couldn't walk straight, and my head seemed stuffed with cotton wool and i couldn't think straight either, so i was glad when i'd sobered up next day and got my brain back..:)

PS again- my ex brother-in-law who I mentioned earlier was a hard-drinking hard-smoking Hell's Angel, and because I don't do either, he once half-jokingly remarked- "Huh, you're not a man if you don't drink and smoke".
He died of cancer in his mid-60's but I'm still around and going strong aged 72..:)
 






Maes17

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Messages
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My dad was a workaholic- literally- and used to pour bottles of wine down his throat in the evenings to relieve his stress.
(My mother would whisper to me- "Look at him, he doesn't bother to enjoy the taste or anything, he just gulps it down")
He died of liver cancer in 1982 aged 62, leaving my mother alone for the final 17 years of her life.

My dads brother (my dear old uncle Bill) was an alcoholic and his mind finally packed up in his 50's up and he ended up deliriously ranting in hospital for a couple of weeks not knowing what planet he was on, until he mercifully died.

PS- I tried a few sips of booze and wine in my early teens (like kids do), but it all tasted like cat pee to me so I've never touched it since except when naughty women have tried to get me drunk at parties, and i've gone along with it to be a good sport.
As it took effect I noticed the earth's axis had took on a severe tilt and I couldn't walk straight, and my head seemed stuffed with cotton wool and i couldn't think straight either, so i was glad when i'd sobered up next day and got my brain back..:)

PS again- my ex brother-in-law who I mentioned earlier was a hard-drinking hard-smoking Hell's Angel, and because I don't do either, he once half-jokingly remarked- "Huh, you're not a man if you don't drink and smoke".
He died of cancer in his mid-60's but I'm still around and going strong aged 72..:)
Stay healthy you old wanker.
Good job
 






Thunderian

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Mar 13, 2017
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In regard to the nicotine addiction, what have you found that helps you, if anything?
I quit probably ten times before I finally kicked it for good.

The first time I used Zyban. I don’t know if it’s still available, but it was an antidepressant by the name of Wellbutrin that turned out to make people stop craving nicotine. It simply made my craving go away, and cigarettes soon tasted disgusting. Plus, it kicked me out of a pretty deep depression, lol.

It was too easy, though, and afterwards I thought I could smoke whenever I wanted and not get hooked again. Ha. I got another prescription for Zyban after smoking for another 15 years, and this time it was useless and just made me mental.

I’ve tried nicotine patches, gum, inhalers, etc. Cold turkey, reduction programs, and other things. I was only able to quit when I actually wanted to, and that’s the key. All those other things are aids to quitting smoking, but if you aren’t serious about quitting, they don’t work.

Good luck. Quitting makes you feel amazing. :)
 






Tidal

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More incentive to quit boozing/smoking-
From time to time i google old TV and film stars to find out if they're still alive or what they died of, and it turns out that many of the ones who died fairly young were drinkers and smokers. For example David Janssen (The Fugitive) died of a heart attack in 1980, aged 48-
Quote from one site- "Janssen became a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker that led to a sad ending,"

 






saki

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Dec 11, 2017
Messages
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....thought I would pitch this out, in case anybody might find it useful.... the referenced drug, baclofen, is 40 years old and not expensive.... however, it must be administered under medical supervision with an orderly and regular dosage increase over time.... it's a muscle relaxant, so the main side-effect is sedation/drowsiness, which alleviates over time...
...I'm taking it myself, and the desired effect is beginning to appear.... alcohol is losing its appeal for me, which is the point....
...if this raises any questions, I'll try to answer as best as I can, from a patient perspective...

Journal of Addiction Medicine and Therapeutic Science
Review Article Open Access Peer-Reviewed
A prescription guide for baclofen in Alcohol Use Disorder- For use by physicians and patients
Abstract
Since the discovery by Olivier Ameisen that high-dose baclofen can produce a state of indifference towards alcohol in those with Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD), the prescription of baclofen in AUD patients has exponentially increased. There are currently hundreds of thousands of patients with AUD who benefit from this treatment in France. However, the prescription of baclofen is difficult in many ways. First, the treatment, which consists in a slow progressive increase of doses, must be individually adapted, some patients needing low doses to achieve a state of indifference, while others need high or very high doses. Second, baclofen produces many adverse effects that can be very uncomfortable for patients, and may sometimes be dangerous. The third is that the patients must be strongly engaged in the management of the treatment, as they are the ones who will have to find the best way to target the moments of cravings and determine the distribution of the doses over the day to limit the occurrence of adverse effects. The doctor: patient therapeutic alliance is therefore a crucial element in the management of baclofen treatment. The present article is a guide written by both doctors and cured patients (“expert patients”) for the prescription of baclofen in AUD.

....more at link....
 






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Kaeya

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Nov 10, 2020
Messages
14
Thank you for your kind words, and congratulations to you for your own hard work on kicking your own addiction! /high-fives through computer/ That's amazing you can be around it and not be tempted or have it bother you - I have a colleague who's been sober off everything for 16 years as well and is able to be in social situations where people are drinking and have it not bother him the same way you've mentioned. He calls its a sort of "transcendence" and says I'll get there eventually, too.

For now, I've been avoiding work cocktail hours/networking meetups or finding excuses to duck out early if I absolutely must go to see a certain person I'm collaborating on a project with, because the temptation is too great. (Corona lockdown has lifted in my area, but people have to wear masks at public indoor places and aren't supposed to be in large groups, but the former is selectively enforced and the latter blatantly ignored in many cases.) The spiritual side of these issues intrigues me and I've found some answers there on our human condition and why we struggle with these issues in the first place. Edge of Wonder is doing a series on the spiritual side of addiction and it's been very eye-opening and helpful to me.
It will get easier if you focus on WHY you don't want to drink, keep your reasons in mind when you're around people who do drink. For me, it helped to think of the most horrible sickening experiences I had while I was drinking (or how ridiculous others act when drinking), and realizing I do not want to experience those kind of things anymore. I've been sober for 5 years now and have had periods where I felt no desire to drink at all, but temptation does creep in from time to time. Also, not everyone around you will always understand you really don't want to drink, so that's why I think, it's important to keep your reasons firmly in mind, all the time. Good luck and stay strong!
 






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