So.... about Australia being on fire?

Carolyn

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Am I missing something or is everyone else? Id have thought there would be some mention of this here since it seems to be turning into the next big mass extinction of animals since the dinosaurs? :|

Maybe I shoulda gone to specsavers eh? :eek:
 






JoChris

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justjess

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I’ve barely seen any mention of it anywhere tbh except for prepper groups i have on Facebook.. I was just telling my husband last night I can’t believe there’s so much silence on it. I read half a billion animals have died in the fires. That’s insane. The fact that there’s crickets about it even more so.

Hope everyone in Australia is staying safe.
 






JoChris

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Its beyond bad, beyond comprehension. Half a billion or more animals dead, threat of extinction of some species, its horrible!!

It is heartbreaking for a nature lover like myself. I have been in so many national parks and I am dreading to see how bad the final outcome is going to be. :(

I’ve barely seen any mention of it anywhere tbh except for prepper groups i have on Facebook.. I was just telling my husband last night I can’t believe there’s so much silence on it. I read half a billion animals have died in the fires. That’s insane. The fact that there’s crickets about it even more so.

Hope everyone in Australia is staying safe.
There haven't been massive casualties, that is probably a major factor. To be on international news it seems that is necessary.
Our exceptionally good rescue services have saved many lives so far.
 






JoChris

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It must be scary too being so close to it all for you, its crazy levels of destruction I don't see how this isn't the biggest global issue at the very least on par with the current situation of impending war with Iran. Such a shitty shitty start to the year.
Maybe one way of looking at glass as half-full is to see that IF all these real crises are here for a while it might put ridiculous identity politics in correct perspective now?
I have said half-jokingly that we need a war to get some topics out of the limelight and force people to toughen up.
 






Carolyn

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Maybe one way of looking at glass as half-full is to see that IF all these real crises are here for a while it might put ridiculous identity politics in correct perspective now?
I have said half-jokingly that we need a war to get some topics out of the limelight and force people to toughen up.
Maybe my glass half empty perspective would see that they would just take advantage of the fact that everybody's looking elsewhere and they will just use that as another opportunity to serve themselves, sneak new laws in while nobody's looking, line their own pockets etc
 






JoChris

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Here's hoping they catch the arsonists who've started almost half the fires.


Here's also hoping that bushfire season goes back to the normal amount of infernos every year. Unless half of those fires are also started by other arsonists, in which case I hope they're also stopped.

Why are there so many arsonists starting wildfires?

How bad does bushfire season usually get? I've seen maps of Australia right now with all these little fire icons all over, but what do those maps usually look like this time of year?

Have arsonists always initiated half the fires, or is it only in the last few decades?

I ask because if I were a desperate enough climate alarmist, I'd be extremely tempted to start extra fires in order to scare the world into climate change action. I would bet a lot of money, if a bookie would ever take a bet like this, that at least one climate activist will be caught setting a fire. If not more.
I bet psychologists would have umpteen theories on that.

I wish they could lock every arsonist up for 10+ years. It has caused deaths and unthinkable loss of nature and property now. You can't put a price on animal and plant species. It really is a web of life.

you know, when I saw Greta Thunberg's reaction part of me wondered if extreme climate alarmists would be secretly celebrating.

 






JoChris

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Maybe my glass half empty perspective would see that they would just take advantage of the fact that everybody's looking elsewhere and they will just use that as another opportunity to serve themselves, sneak new laws in while nobody's looking, line their own pockets etc
True. The people with excessive power always seem to find some strings to pull to get any major crisis to work in their favour.
 






JoChris

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Sure, as passive observers all the nation's arsonists must be perversely delighted. But there are dozens of arsonists who literally themselves started half of these fires. They must be feeling a special satanic joy right now. Aside from however many arsonists started fires for the "good cause" of climate change awareness, although they would probably feel a deranged pride, too.

Does Australia have the death penalty? (Looking it up) Nope. Even though over half the country would support it for terrorist acts. Well, maybe some of you guys can catch one of the arsonists yourselves and apply some vigilante justice. Torture him or her. Burn at the stake. Make an example.

As for a glass-one-fifth-full perspective, at least there won't be as much fuel for the fires next year.
I am sure there are some who would love to do justice to the arsonist. Locking up arsonists for a LONG time so they can't reoffend would be almost as good. Criminals in jail would do it for us if they could.

Years ago there was massive debate about controlled burns to stop massive bushfires but the Greens Party especially wouldn't permit that "because of the harm to nature".

I thought this article would be blocked - just in case it is only temporarily available I will put it here.

Greens playing politics with fire, say Labor and Coalition
Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack in Warana, Queensland, on Sunday. Picture: AAP
Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack in Warana, Queensland, on Sunday. Picture: AAP
Senior Coalition and Labor MPs have launched a bitter attack on the Greens for suggesting climate change policies are responsible for the catastrophic bushfire threat confronting NSW and Queensland.
As firefighters braced for the arrival of high winds and low humidity that threaten some of the worst conditions seen since the Black Saturday bushfires a decade ago, Greens leader Richard Di Natale sparked fury from both major parties when he said the nation’s emissions policy had caused the fires that killed three people and injured 100.
READ MORE: Greens pour fuel on fires | Greens policies increasing bushfire threat: Joyce | Nimbin hippies admit bush got too wild | Safety ‘can’t be put on backburner’ | Carbon talk fanciful when jury’s still out on drought | States brace for economic firestorm |
READ NEXT
Senior Nationals turned the attack back on the Greens, suggesting that environmental opposition to backburning, particularly in national parks, had exacerbated the bushfire threat.
NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro criticised his state’s National Parks Service for contributing to the catastrophic threat facing the state by failing to carry out extensive backburning in the lead-up to bushfire season.
“We need to do more hazard reduction, (burning) in national parks to manage the fuel load,” Mr Barilaro told The Australian. “Everyone knows that this is a real issue and I’ve got the guts to say it.”
READ MORE:Greens pour fuel on fires
Senator Di Natale sparked the row on Monday when he said: “Every politician, lobbyist, pundit and journalist who has fought to block serious action on climate change bears responsibility for the increasing risk from a heating planet that is producing these deadly bushfires.”

Federal Labor agriculture spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon, who is facing fire threats in his NSW seat of Hunter, lashed the Greens for politicising the catastrophe.
Mr Fitzgibbon said it was “absolutely the wrong time to be looking for political opportunity and it’s also hypocritical given the Greens opposed the CPRS (the Rudd government’s carbon pollution reduction scheme)”.
“But if Scott Morrison wasn’t sitting back and allowing emissions to increase every year there would be less political tension in the necessary community conversation about the need to act and adapt to our changing weather patterns,” he added.
Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack criticised the Greens’ comments as the “disgraceful, disgusting” behaviour of “raving inner-city lunatics”.
The Nationals leader said Australia had experienced bushfires since “time began” and he found it “galling” that people linked the catastrophe with climate change. “What people need now is a little bit of sympathy, understanding and real assistance, they need help, they need shelter,” Mr McCormack said. “They don’t need the ravings of some pure, enlightened and woke capital-city greenies at this time when they’re trying to save their homes.”
However, Greens MP Adam Bandt said Mr McCormack was a “dangerous fool” who was putting lives at risk through the government’s inaction on climate change.
“Thoughts and prayers are not enough; we need science and action too,” Mr Bandt said. “They’ve done everything in their power to make these catastrophic fires more likely. When you cuddle coal in Canberra, the rest of the country burns.”
Former prime minister Kevin Rudd hit out at the Greens’ comments, pointing out it was the Greens who had blocked action on climate change when they opposed the CPRS in 2009.
“Seriously? If it weren’t for the Green party’s political opportunism in 2009-10, we would now be 10 years into an emissions trading scheme, a fully functioning carbon price, a long-term transition from coal and leading global action on climate,” Mr Rudd told The Australian.
“Instead, what did the Green party do? To try and score political points off my government, they hypocritically jumped into bed with the Liberals to defeat my legislation in the Senate. The rest is history.”

NSW Agriculture Minister Adam Marshall echoed Mr Barilaro’s sentiments, saying: “More needs to be done to clear fire trails, back burning operations and allow controlled stock grazing to keep fuel loads down. Better management would help enormously and lack of good quality local management has contributed.”
Mr Marshall told parliament three weeks ago that he had written to state Environment Minister Matt Kean “requesting a full and immediate review of fire management in the state’s national parks”.
“It is clear that landholders felt that there is a ‘lock it and leave it’ approach to management in national parks, which is not good enough,” Mr Marshall said at the time.
Nationals MP Barnaby Joyce said it was “infuriating” the Greens were attempting to score political points by saying the government’s “inaction” on climate change had contributed to fires that had killed three people.
Mr Joyce said climate change action in Australia would do nothing to reduce the bushfire risk unless there was also action taken by China, India and the US.
Australia produced 1.3 per cent of the planet’s emissions, compared with China’s 27.5 per cent and the 14.75 per cent that comes from the US.
Mr Joyce, a former deputy prime minister, said people were “once again talking about indigenous land management” because there were too many regulations around controlled burning ahead of bushfire season.
“We haven’t had the capacity to easily access (hazard) reduction burns because of all of the paperwork that is part of green policy,” Mr Joyce said.
NSW Rural Fire Service deputy commissioner Rob Rogers denied there had been less hazard-reduction burning than in previous years. “Hazard reductions have gone on each and every year. Each year we don’t get as much done as we would like,” he said.
Mr Rogers cited an example of a fire near Lithgow in an area that had burned only five years ago and declared “you can never burn (as hazard reduction) the amount of area that has now burned’’. He said hazard reduction on its own was not enough to prevent bushfires.
Shine Energy chief executive Ash Dodd, an indigenous businessman trying to build a coal-fired power station in central Queensland, said traditional owners had undertaken hazard reduction to manage the fire risk “since time immemorial”.
“The responsibility of the build-up of surplus fuel must lay at the hands of state governments which do not allow seasonal burning based upon the traditions and customs of Australian traditional owners such as the Birri people,” Mr Dodd said.
Hazard-reduction burning has also been a contentious issue in Queensland.
A Queensland Audit Office report issued last year revealed the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services had missed key deadlines to improve the state’s bushfire readiness.
The report, itself a follow up to a highly critical audit of QFES in 2014, had “improved its visibility and oversight” of bushfire risk, including establishing the Office of Bushfire Mitigation and area fire management groups. However, the audit office said the authority had not fully implemented any of the original 2014 recommendations despite committing to do so by the following year.
University of Wollongong bushfire management expert Professor Ross Bradstock said it was misguided to blame insufficient hazard reduction for the massive bushfires.
“Hazard reduction work in general has increased in NSW,” Professor Bradstock said. “There has been better targeting, so it is being done where it is more effective. We may find there are major success stories where properties have been saved.”
Professor Bradstock said there were always going to be limitations to the effectiveness of such preventative measures.
Despite $100m spent on hazard reduction, he said, “it only mitigates a small amount of risk”.
Labor Senate leader Penny Wong said the immediate focus should be on firefighters battling the blazes, as well as people at risk and those grieving lost loved ones.
“But I will say, it is the responsible thing, when we are through this current crisis, to focus on what we have to do to keep Australians safe,” she told parliament.
“When I was climate minister, scientists were already warning of more intense fire seasons. Regrettably, these warnings have been proved correct.”
Additional reporting: Craig Johnstone, Olivia Caisley, Ean Higgins
 






elsbet

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"They’ve done everything in their power to make these catastrophic fires more likely."

I know it's probably just a radical politician hyperbolizing, but...it kind of sounds like both the projection of an arsonist (substitute "I've" and "mine") and also the victim-blaming of a terrorist ("You brought this on yourself.")

Interesting that Green regulations made controlled burns harder. Interesting that Greens opposed that carbon tax legislation. Seems like they're pretty counterproductive. Like a pattern. Maybe they really do want climate change destruction. They're socialists more than environmentalists, and climate change is the best leverage that they'll ever have to install their agenda.

I hope some conservatives in your equivalent of the FBI will investigate to see if any Greens with firefighting or arson backgrounds have been doing a lot of travelling lately. Then again, if the brush is so dry, it probably wouldn't take an expert.
'Interesting that Green regulations made controlled burns harder.'​

Yes... all of the above.

The greenies often rank no.1, if memory serves, on the 'terrorism' watchlist, and have for a long time. They may well be on the inside, by now-- if they weren't, already.
 






Pan

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The Australian Bushfires are part of the UN’s Agenda 2030. These fires have been planned for years and serve multiple agendas.

The global elite want to force everyone into SMART cities (which are the high-surveillance tech city dystopias of the future) and they will use climate change as the excuse. Added benefits include; Controlling all human behaviour in the name of “Climate protection.”

This plan is so cynical and brilliant. Our social engineers are true Masters of Reality.

See article below for some useful facts on the situation.


Here’s another article from Henry Makow which shows how Australia has sold its Water Rights overseas;

 






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Carolyn

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The Australian Bushfires are part of the UN’s Agenda 2030. These fires have been planned for years and serve multiple agendas.

The global elite want to force everyone into SMART cities (which are the highly surveillance tech city dystopias of the future) and they will use climate change as the excuse. Added benefits include; Controlling all human behaviour in the name of “Climate protection.”

This plan is so cynical and brilliant. Our social engineers are true Masters of Reality.

See article below for some useful facts on the situation.


Here’s another article from Henry Makow which shows how Australia has sold its Water Rights overseas;


 






JoChris

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The Australian Bushfires are part of the UN’s Agenda 2030. These fires have been planned for years and serve multiple agendas.

The global elite want to force everyone into SMART cities (which are the high-surveillance tech city dystopias of the future) and they will use climate change as the excuse. Added benefits include; Controlling all human behaviour in the name of “Climate protection.”

This plan is so cynical and brilliant. Our social engineers are true Masters of Reality.

See article below for some useful facts on the situation.


Here’s another article from Henry Makow which shows how Australia has sold its Water Rights overseas;

It is times like these that really do make me wonder. Australia's population is already mostly in capital cities; people (especially with families) whose homes have been destroyed really have no option but move to cities for at least the short term. Schools will have been destroyed along with many shops.
 






JoChris

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24 dead now. This is absolutely terrible for a country like mine.


The charity being done though, including by people who have lost their homes is incredible and is definitely showing Australia's good side.
 






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