Roger Waters (Pink Floyd) Interview

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May 3, 2018
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#6
What would he have to be afraid of? There's nothing brave about being a prejudiced, ignorant jackass.
I know absolutely nothing about this man. For the first time I heard about him and his musical group only when I saw the interview. At least there he speaks sensibly.
 





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#9
Roger Waters is a fairly intelligent fellow, primary writer of the crushingly famous Pink-Floyd album 'The Wall', and the similarly themed, less crushingly famous album 'The Final Cut'. Both are laments for the deterioration of the world's, particularly England's ethos in the aftermath of the second world war, and how the 'Post-war dream' was abandoned for wealth, business, and yet more war.

The Wall is a rock-opera, telling the story of a jaded rock-star whose father was killed rather pointlessly in the second world war. Increasingly twisted and resentful of his country, mother, ex-wife and life, he builds a metaphorical wall around himself, transforming himself and his band into a vicious Neo-Nazi movement, coming to represent everything his father died fighting. He leads a campaign of violence and intolerance, espousing staunch Nationalism and the expulsion of all foreigners, only to have a complete mental breakdown and descend into madness, judged by a massive, testicle-chinned sphincter.
The Final Cut is similarly themed, but doesn't tell such a narrative story; instead a brooding reflection on the current state of England and the world, our misguided priorities and obsessions, and all the broken promises and trampled dreams inflicted by our leaders in the aftermath of WWII. The later link I include is one of my favorite songs from the album, an encouragement to lock all our war-obsessed leaders up in an 'OId Folks Home' with a nefarious intent.

He's a smart guy, and quite determinedly obsessed with these political issues, which is what lead to his eventual split from Pink Floyd. He wanted to keep making more and more political music, the rest of the band wanted to start making more artful, instrumentally focused stuff.