psychiatry isn't a science, it's a huge FRAUD

Tidal

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Are you on thyroxin now? Or can you manage it in another way?

My new doctor had given me blood tests which showed my thyroid was underactive but he said he didn't want to prescribe thyroxine (the standard cure) because it was only "borderline" underactive and he preferred waiting to see if it cleared up on its own, so I had to go on feeling cold, tired and sluggish for the next couple of years til it did eventually clear up.
I'd researched the condition on the net and found out that fluoride might have a bad effect on peoples thyroids, so I switched to fluoride-free toothpaste and that probably helped it clear up. i'd also heard that grapefruit might help, so I started eating grapefruit slices and that might have helped too.
 






Tidal

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Incidentally we don't know if Jesus cured mental illness, but his interaction with a hyper woman named Martha in Luke chapter 10 was interesting because basically he urged her to chill out and relax more.

On the day that Jesus visited, Martha’s desire was to be a good hostess—to serve the best meal with the best possible presentation, for Jesus’ sake. Her sister, Mary, however, was taking some time out to listen to Jesus
Martha became a little cross with Mary and spoke rather abruptly-“Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”
Jesus, who was able to see into her soul, diagnosed her problem: she was worried and troubled about the serving and had no peace in her heart. He gently told Martha that a simple dinner was more than adequate.

PS- My family were hyper too, my dad was a chronic workaholic, my mother, sister and an aunt were neurotic, an uncle drank himself to death, another uncle worshipped money, another aunt had OCD (couldn't stop cleaning her house).
All of them except my sister are dead now and are in their graves, so all that fretting and worrying didn't do them a bit of good.
 






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Hon33

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Incidentally we don't know if Jesus cured mental illness, but his interaction with a hyper woman named Martha in Luke chapter 10 was interesting because basically he urged her to chill out and relax more.

On the day that Jesus visited, Martha’s desire was to be a good hostess—to serve the best meal with the best possible presentation, for Jesus’ sake. Her sister, Mary, however, was taking some time out to listen to Jesus
Martha became a little cross with Mary and spoke rather abruptly-“Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”
Jesus, who was able to see into her soul, diagnosed her problem: she was worried and troubled about the serving and had no peace in her heart. He gently told Martha that a simple dinner was more than adequate.

PS- My family were hyper too, my dad was a chronic workaholic, my mother, sister and an aunt were neurotic, an uncle drank himself to death, another uncle worshipped money, another aunt had OCD (couldn't stop cleaning her house).
All of them except my sister are dead now and are in their graves, so all that fretting and worrying didn't do them a bit of good.
OCD has little to do with cleaning your house. That is a myth propagated by people who don’t understand what the condition actually is.
I think one reason people get so confused about psychiatry is that they don’t really understand the differences between psychiatry and clinical psychology.
Psychiatrists are clinically trained medical doctors. Clinical Psychologists are not. Psychiatrists are usually the people diagnosing mental health conditions and prescribing treatment for them. They might refer you on, to a psychologist or they might prescribe medication.
In some instances, medication is appropriate, but for a long time there was definitely a trend within psychiatry to throw medication at everyone. in the U.K. at least, there is definitely a move away from that now.
 






Tidal

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OCD has little to do with cleaning your house. That is a myth propagated by people who don’t understand what the condition actually is..

I thought OCD stands for 'Obsessive Compulsive Disorder'?
My auntie Jean certainly had an obsession with cleaning her house that went far and above ordinary normal housework.
Once she was in the middle of hoovering and wouldn't stop to open the door when my mum went to visit her; "I'M NOT STOPPING" she called out, so my mum turned round and walked off in disgust and never spoke to her again, and neither did I.
 






manama

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I thought OCD stands for 'Obsessive Compulsive Disorder'?
My auntie Jean certainly had an obsession with cleaning her house that went far and above ordinary normal housework.
Once she was in the middle of hoovering and wouldn't stop to open the door when my mum went to visit her; "I'M NOT STOPPING" she called out, so my mum turned round and walked off in disgust and never spoke to her again, and neither did I.
It is obsessive compulsive disorder but not in that manner, it being about severe cleaning is just a common misconception.
 






Hon33

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I thought OCD stands for 'Obsessive Compulsive Disorder'?
My auntie Jean certainly had an obsession with cleaning her house that went far and above ordinary normal housework.
Once she was in the middle of hoovering and wouldn't stop to open the door when my mum went to visit her; "I'M NOT STOPPING" she called out, so my mum turned round and walked off in disgust and never spoke to her again, and neither did I.
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a very complex mental health condition. It is a cycle of irrational thoughts and anxieties which sufferers often control - but not always - by carrying out a series of unrelated compulsions/rituals. Sometimes those compulsions and rituals will centre around cleaning, very often they will not.
The sufferer will have thoughts that induce anxiety - often intrusive, disturbing, irrational thoughts. The sufferer will try and control these thoughts with carrying out some kind of ritualistic behaviour to reduce the anxiety. The compulsion may or may not be related to the obsessive thought. So someone may have anxiety about contamination and therefore they clean. Equally, they may fear that they are going to hurt a loved one and clean because they believe that by doing so, it will stop the loved one being hurt.
In a large percentage of cases, there will be intrusive, unwanted thoughts which are not accompanied by compulsions or rituals because it is the obsessive thoughts which are central to the condition and not the compulsions rituals.
You can have OCD and not have a full range of compulsions/rituals. You cannot however, have OCD - clinical OCD - without the thoughts. Obsessive behaviour in itself, is not enough to describe someone as OCD - habitual cleaning, for example is not in itself OCD - everyone displays some degree of obsession, to one point or another. It does not mean they have OCD.
Oh, and one other factor, the person with OCD will know their thoughts are irrational. They will often be horrified by their thoughts, which can be very intrusive and disturbing. They will often hate themselves for the thoughts they have - at least until they are diagnosed and understand it’s due to the condition they have.
Your aunt may or may not have had OCD, depending on the reason why she cleaned. If she did, neither your’s nor your mother’s actions, will have been very helpful.
 






Dtrizzle2091

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I think people mean well. I think the science of how people think and why people act the way they do has been around since Hippocrates. With that being said, I agree with your sentiment. I was diagnosed with post partum depression after my first baby and they put me on Prozac. A low dose. It helped. Four years later I’m still on this stupid low dose because I cannot wean off of it without my mind going insane. I’ve tried several times. I don’t think I ever really needed it but, my doctor was trained to diagnose and prescribe unfortunately.

On the other hand, I work on a neurology floor. I’ve come across some extremely unstable individuals. These are the small percent that I believe are truly mentally ill. Is the cocktail of medications they try with them the answer? Probably not.

In conclusion. Do I think mental illness is glamorized, overdiagnosed and overprescribed in our society? Yes. Do I think the elite are using this to their advantage to control the masses? Yes. Do I think it’s completely fake? No.
 






Awoken2

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When meds are prescribed properly and there is an actual accurate diagnosis made they can be life saving. I’ve seen it numerous times. I’ve also seen the bad irresponsible end many times. Psychiatry is a tool which can be used - like any tool - for “good or evil”
I think this is totally dependent on the moral character of the person who claims to know your mind better than you do yourself. It's like handing somebody your remote control so they can then tell you what channel your on at any given time.

That's my guess anyway, but I've never seen a shrink so I dunno.
 






Hon33

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I think people mean well. I think the science of how people think and why people act the way they do has been around since Hippocrates. With that being said, I agree with your sentiment. I was diagnosed with post partum depression after my first baby and they put me on Prozac. A low dose. It helped. Four years later I’m still on this stupid low dose because I cannot wean off of it without my mind going insane. I’ve tried several times. I don’t think I ever really needed it but, my doctor was trained to diagnose and prescribe unfortunately.

On the other hand, I work on a neurology floor. I’ve come across some extremely unstable individuals. These are the small percent that I believe are truly mentally ill. Is the cocktail of medications they try with them the answer? Probably not.

In conclusion. Do I think mental illness is glamorized, overdiagnosed and overprescribed in our society? Yes. Do I think the elite are using this to their advantage to control the masses? Yes. Do I think it’s completely fake? No.
I have been on Venlafaxine since the day my youngest daughter was born, almost 19 years ago because I had suffered severe post-natal depression with my eldest daughter.
I was on the highest clinical dose for 17 of those years, that could be managed without being hospitalised. I couldn’t get the dose lowered because of the horrendous side effects of doing so.
When I had a subarachnoid haemorrhage 18 months ago, they reduced it to the lowest possible dose for maintenance, while I was ill. The pharmacist wanted to increase it again to the maximum dose, because he felt that having a brain injury was not a good time to start messing around with doses. I begged them not to. I tried going home on the lower maintenance dose but the side-effects were too severe. My GP agreed to step the dose up slightly and I have managed well with it.
How I handle emotion has changed since my brain injury because after a while my brain switches off, when it reaches capacity.
However, for the first time in all those years, I am feeling a wider variety of emotion. When I was on the higher dose of anti-depressant I was either permanently anxious or permanently switched off - no in-between.
A dose of anti-depressant which is too high can cause as many problems as a dose which is too low.
 






Dtrizzle2091

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Valid points. I didn’t get into the scope of brain injuries and how they affect behavior but I was certainly thinking that. I’m sorry you’ve gone through all of this crap. It’s not easy stuff.
 






Vixy

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It is fraud, yes. Check this out:


I made a thread about it too:


I have had friends going to the psychiatry industry seeking help fpr anxiety or depression and guess what? They never got any better, they got worse! They pump them up with drugs until theyre unrecognizable. My close and very dear friend was yellow under her eyes last time I saw her, indicating theyre pumping her so full of meds, her liver and kidneys can't cope. She was all haywire last time we spoke. I've never seen her like that. Truly scary. Its beyongd a scam, its an industry of death, another way for them to kill us off.

Same thing with a schizophrenic friend of mine, they pumped her full of injections to the point she was shaking and couldnt hold a glass without spilling, didnt get any better either. I felt so sorry for them both watching this happen.

I could tell you so many stories of how they were treated aswell since I went with my schizophrenic friend to her psychiatrist. They really talked down to her like she was garbage and she was so sick she didnt notice it. They force her to have injections that make her worse, they look and talk down to her and yeah..it's not good. I stopped going with her bc I couldnt witness it anymore.

Psychiatry makes me sick, honestly. Most patients there are suffering from heavy metal toxicity, for instance schizophrenia is bc of copper overload, which my friend have had measured and she had so much copper in her system, she topped the scale, they couldnt measure it that high and they dont even know about this because its not part of the education. So the patients go year after years only becoming worse of best case scenario status quo.

It's sickening. :mad:
 






Hon33

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Valid points. I didn’t get into the scope of brain injuries and how they affect behavior but I was certainly thinking that. I’m sorry you’ve gone through all of this crap. It’s not easy stuff.
Thank you. It’s been hard but it could always be worse.
The point I was making though, was really agreeing with you about the overprescribing of anti-depressants which are supposed to be non-addictive but are in fact, very difficult to stop taking.
I now know, that I was on a dose which was probably much too high for years. Being ventilated when I had my brain injury, was the perfect time to reduce the dose without me being aware of withdrawal. However, even after weeks of a lower dose, my body was still reacting and I needed to revert to a higher maintenance dose. Thankfully, it is still lower than the original and actually allows me to have more variation in emotion. Does that make sense?
One benefit of my brain injury is that I now seem to have a built-in mechanism, which limits how stressed I can become, before my brain automatically checks out.
In any case, my psychiatrist thought I needed anti-depressants to stop me developing post-natal depression so severely as I had before. It wasn’t successful, so I ended up on a very high dose which I then couldn’t get off. It was probably making the anxiety and depression worse than it needed to be.
 






Tidal

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..Your aunt may or may not have had OCD, depending on the reason why she cleaned. If she did, neither your’s nor your mother’s actions, will have been very helpful.
Like I said, my aunt was in the middle of a cleaning spree, so when she shouted "I'M NOT STOPPING", there was nothing my mother could have done except walk off, right?
If she'd stayed how would that have helped aunt?

PS- Cleaning and tidiness was a lifelong obsession with aunt, she was far gone, I remember as a kid I said to her son (my cousin Dave) "Shall we play with your big red fire engine again", and he replied "Mam threw it away".
He must have left it on the floor the last time he played with it, so to punish him for not putting it neatly away in the toy cupboard, she slung it in the dustbin.
 






Lisa

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Like I said, my aunt was in the middle of a cleaning spree, so when she shouted "I'M NOT STOPPING", there was nothing my mother could have done except walk off, right?
If she'd stayed how would that have helped aunt?

PS- Cleaning and tidiness was a lifelong obsession with aunt, she was far gone, I remember as a kid I said to her son (my cousin Dave) "Shall we play with your big red fire engine again", and he replied "Mam threw it away".
He must have left it on the floor the last time he played with it, so to punish him for not putting it neatly away in the toy cupboard, she slung it in the dustbin.
Maybe she could have helped her clean up and stayed for tea after?
 






Lisa

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Nah, because if you pander to people like that, they might think you APPROVE of their obsession..:p
That would have been a nice thing to do and could have kept the relationship in tact...we all have problems.
 






Tidal

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That would have been a nice thing to do and could have kept the relationship in tact...we all have problems.
To keep the relationship intact when my mother knocked her door, aunt could have switched off her hoover, opened the door with a big smile, hugged my mum and said "Come on in darling, it's lovely to see you, I'll put the kettle on".
 






Lisa

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To keep the relationship intact when my mother knocked her door, aunt could have switched off her hoover, opened the door with a big smile, hugged my mum and said "Come on in darling, it's lovely to see you, I'll put the kettle on".
I get that..but she knows she has a problem. Was your mom invited over..or did she just come by..maybe that‘s another factor?
 






Hon33

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Nah, because if you pander to people like that, they might think you APPROVE of their obsession..:p
Well you are right, to a certain degree.
It is best if you have a loved one with OCD, that you don’t facilitate or enable their obsessions. By doing so, you only reinforce the anxiety. To reduce anxiety, you have to confront it. To hide from it, which is effectively what the obsessions do, the anxiety is allowed to grow.
In saying that however, to never speak to your aunt again, may have been a bit harsh.
It’s likely your aunt didn’t have OCD, but an obsessive personality. Without knowing her, it would be impossible to say. She may have been struggling with something greater than either you or your mother understood.
 






Tidal

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I get that..but she knows she has a problem. Was your mom invited over..or did she just come by..maybe that‘s another factor?
I don't know if aunt knew she had an obsession demon, but if she did she certainly didn't do anything to break its hold on her.
Perhaps she thought her obsession was a perfectly normal thing, in which case there'd be no cure because you can't cure anybody if they don't know they need curing.

What happened was that my mam Marge bumped into auntie's husband while shopping, and he invited her over, but when they arrived and he said "Marge's here", that's when Jean shouted "I'm not stopping" because she was in the middle of a ritual hoovering frenzy.
I don't know if aunt was a Christian, but she certainly disregarded these verses-
"Resist the devil and he will flee from you" (James 4:7)
"Don't give the devil a foothold" (Eph 4:27)
 






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