Left vs Right dichotomy

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#21
There is no Right v. Left dichotomy. Not really. It's a distraction from the Authoritarian vs. Libertarian conflict. The powers that be can survive in communist of capitalist states, since it's the State itself which grants them power. Without the State (or state-like entities like corporations), it can't exist.
 





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#22
There is no Right v. Left dichotomy. Not really. It's a distraction from the Authoritarian vs. Libertarian conflict. The powers that be can survive in communist of capitalist states, since it's the State itself which grants them power. Without the State (or state-like entities like corporations), it can't exist.
There is a right/left dichotomy, as far as political science goes. The designation of authoritarian vs. libertarian (state vs. individual control) is still generalized by the term right and left. As I was saying earlier- without accepting the terminology of traditional political theory, it's impossible to have a coherent conversation.

This is a chart of the commonly accepted political spectrum:



We have a social scale and economic scale. This makes is possible to contrast the (economic)socialism of Nazi Germany and China vs. that of the Green Party (less state control).



There are all types of charts based on separate criteria. I'm fully aware this info isn't what @Mark Sunnyfield was asking by starting this thread (which I want to reply to as well), but I think it's important to review these concepts for the sake of clarity. I think that yes, there are "right" vs. "left" ideologies. We can place our political beliefs somewhere on the scale.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_spectrum

About the Political Compass

"Both an economic dimension and a social dimension are important factors for a proper political analysis. By adding the social dimension you can show that Stalin was an authoritarian leftist (ie the state is more important than the individual) and that Gandhi, believing in the supreme value of each individual, is a liberal leftist. While the former involves state-imposed arbitrary collectivism in the extreme top left, on the extreme bottom left is voluntary collectivism at regional level, with no state involved. Hundreds of such anarchist communities existed in Spain during the civil war period...

...The chart also makes clear that, despite popular perceptions, the opposite of fascism is not communism but anarchism (ie liberal socialism), and that the opposite of communism ( ie an entirely state-planned economy) is neo-liberalism (ie extreme deregulated economy)."