Is Pink Floyd's music occult-free or not?

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#41
David Gilmore's song "Rattle that Lock" is about the fall of Lucifer from heaven to earth. The lyrics and video are very revealing.

 





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#42
The Division Bell and many other songs lyrics are telling. The Floyd was too good not to have a deal with the Devil.

The lunatic is in my head
The lunatic is in my head
You raise the blade, you make the change
You re-arrange me 'til I'm sane
You lock the door
And throw away the key
There's someone in my head but it's not me

And if the cloud bursts, thunder in your ear
You shout and no one seems to hear
And if the band you're in starts playing different tunes
I'll see you on the dark side of the moon



Pink Floyd in "Sheep"
"The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want . . . With bright knives he RELEASETH MY SOUL/ He maketh me to hang on hooks in high places . . . For lo, he hath great power and GREAT HUNGER."

Pink Floyd's music says it all; it is pure SORCERY! The music, lyrics and visual effects are designed to hypnotize the audience, placing them in an occult induced psycho-trance state. The ultimate goal is to heighten the sense of alienation and futility in each person, towards life, society, family and draw people unwittingly into a saturation of the senses. The music "soundscapes" crafted to generate a temporary feeling of UNIVERSAL "belonging" that eventually dissipates into emptiness, which then exacerbates feelings of loneliness, anger, alienation and finally a sense of resignation (hopelessness.) As the mysterious but seducing waves of melancholic sound sweep over the listener, a feeling of loss is strangely offset by the sensual rapture of the moment, the pounding bass, mournful vocals and haunting guitar solos. The psycho-emotional state created by this band emanates forth from a "SPIRITUAL" (demonic) source exerting an MK Ultra mind control effect on human minds, especially when experienced with drugs, which for most concert attendees is almost MANDATORY. Psychotropic drugs open spiritual doors; it's pure sorcery and it's dangerous!
 





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#43
The very first words they say is “breathe in the air. Don’t be afraid to care..“ They use euphemisms such tiger flying in the sunshine n run rabbit run dig that hole.
Your interpretation makes no sense. The song Breathe is anti-capitalist, it's about how we're working ourselves to death in a way:

Breathe, breathe in the air
Don't be afraid to care

Leave, don't leave me
Look around, choose your own ground

Long you live and high you fly
Smiles you'll give and tears you'll cry
And all you touch and all you see
Is all your life will ever be


Run, rabbit, run
Dig that hole, forget the sun

When at last the work is done
Don't sit down, it's time to dig another one

Long you live and high you fly
But only if you ride the tide
Balanced on the biggest wave

Race towards an early grave

The whole meaning to that song is in the very last line.

The Division Bell and many other songs lyrics are telling.
Such as what?

The lunatic is in my head
The lunatic is in my head
You raise the blade, you make the change
You re-arrange me 'til I'm sane
You lock the door
And throw away the key
There's someone in my head but it's not me

And if the cloud bursts, thunder in your ear
You shout and no one seems to hear
And if the band you're in starts playing different tunes
I'll see you on the dark side of the moon
Whilst the album DSOTM is a commentary on death and capitalism, the theme of politics and media is present there. The phrase "you raise the blade, you make the change" is a direct reference to television, as is "there's someone in my head but it's not me".

Considering that all of the lyrics of DSOTM where written by Roger Waters, who is well known outside of Floyd to be a political activist, this just makes more sense.

Pink Floyd in ‘Sheep’

"The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want . . . With bright knives, he releaseth my soul/ He maketh me to hang on hooks in high places . . . For lo, he hath great power and great hunger."​


Pink Floyd in "Sheep"

"The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want . . . With bright knives he RELEASETH MY SOUL/ He maketh me to hang on hooks in high places . . . For lo, he hath great power and GREAT HUNGER."​
Orwell's "Animal Farm" is what that album is loosely based off. All of the themes are derived from it. Again, lyrics by Roger Waters, who happens to be an atheist, so him having sarcastic views towards Christianity (of which he does have) wouldn't surprise me.

The same song states:

You better watch out
There may be dogs about
I've looked over Jordan and I have seen
Things are not what they seem


---

What do you get for pretending the danger's not real
Meek and obedient you follow the leader
Down well trodden corridors into the valley of steel


---

Have you heard the news?
The dogs are dead!
You better stay home
And do as you're told
Get out of the road if you want to grow old


He does repeat a lot of the same political themes, probably for good reason, he seems to repeat the same sentiments as this forum. Considering that, I wouldn't be surprised if much of the demographic of this forum was guys in their 50s/60s who grew up listening to Floyd who are disillusioned by society ;)
 





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