Conspiracy theories make one possibly criminal....

saki

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....just found this in the New York Post.... I disagree profoundly with the study conclusion.
Between the lines, I gather that the conclusion is something like: "those who believe in conspiracies are not simply misguided fools..... but actually more likely to embrace/approve of criminality.....and may even be criminals themselves"...
It's isn't enough to disrupt discussions and drive those who challenge TPTB narratives to the margins of society.... we have to criminalize their thoughts and beliefs....
Throwing it out there for all to see


Believing conspiracy theories might make you a criminal: study
By Rob Bailey-Millado

February 26, 2019 | 3:38pm


Composite: Shutterstock

Go figure: If you’re a birther or a 9/11 denier, chances are you aren’t much fun to be around. Sure, we’ve been saying this about our wack-job uncle for years — but now it’s backed up by science.

People who buy into outrageous conspiracy theories — say, that no human has ever walked on the moon or the ancient pyramids were built by aliens — are more inclined to actively engage in anti-social behavior.

That’s the main finding of a team of psychologists from the UK’s Staffordshire University and the University of Kent, who investigated the wider impact these paranoia-fueled fringe beliefs can have on behavior.

“Our research has shown for the first time the role that conspiracy theories can play in determining an individual’s attitude to everyday crime,” study co-author and Kent professor Karen Douglas said in a statement. “It demonstrates that people subscribing to the view that others have conspired might be more inclined toward unethical actions.”

With contemporary conspiracy theories targeting everything from myths surrounding the Mueller report to the chilling “secret” behind Disney’s “Frozen,” this cultural phenomenon is certainly ripe for clinical exploration.

As such, the new study measured participants’ “belief in general notions of conspiracy” as well as how much they agreed with specific theories (“There was an official campaign by MI6 to assassinate Princess Diana”). Those inclined to believe the theories were “more accepting of everyday crime,” such as demanding a refund for no appropriate reason.

In addition, exposure to conspiracy theories was found to make people more apt to engage in low-level criminal activity. Researchers found that this tendency was “directly linked to an individual’s feeling of a lack of social cohesion or shared values, known as anomie.”

For the non-psycholinguists out there, anomie is defined as “the lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.”

Or, as co-author Dan Jolley of Staffordshire put it, “People believing in conspiracy theories are more likely to be accepting of everyday crime, while exposure to theories increases a feeling of anomie, which in turn predicts increased future everyday crime intentions.”
 






DesertRose

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Or, as co-author Dan Jolley of Staffordshire put it, “People believing in conspiracy theories are more likely to be accepting of everyday crime, while exposure to theories increases a feeling of anomie, which in turn predicts increased future everyday crime intentions.”
That statement above is chilling.....
This has happened before and is happening in other countries now i.e China.
First the thought policing then the incarceration.
Groups tptb do not like :
second amendment advocates (US)
whistle-blowers
Muslim advocates
Christian advocates
Far left gps/Far right groups
Any peoples currently deemed undesirable.

 






Last edited:

saki

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Dec 11, 2017
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815
.....I had to look up "anomie" never heard that word before...
I think you are right, Desert Rose.... it's the beginnings of criminalizing divergent thought... which departs from "the official story"....

an·o·mie Dictionary result for anomie
/ˈanəˌmē/

noun
  1. lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.
    "the theory that high-rise architecture leads to anomie in the residents"
 






DesertRose

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lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.
"the theory that high-rise architecture leads to anomie in the residents
yeah also a breakdown of social bonds and the alienation of people. Sigh

The West has to decide if they will uphold a central ideal, "freedom of thought."
Freedom of thought (also called freedom of conscience or ideas) is the freedom of an individual to hold or consider a fact, viewpoint, or thought, independent of others' viewpoints.
Freedom of thought - Wikipedia

 






Todd

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Seems to me you could easily influence the results of a study like this by selectively choosing which conspiracy theories the subjects actually believe in.

Besides there is no such thing as a typical demographic for those who entertain and give serious consideration to conspiracy theories.

What a ridiculous premise...
 






Last edited:

Awoken2

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Jan 22, 2018
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....just found this in the New York Post.... I disagree profoundly with the study conclusion.
Between the lines, I gather that the conclusion is something like: "those who believe in conspiracies are not simply misguided fools..... but actually more likely to embrace/approve of criminality.....and may even be criminals themselves"...
It's isn't enough to disrupt discussions and drive those who challenge TPTB narratives to the margins of society.... we have to criminalize their thoughts and beliefs....
Throwing it out there for all to see


Believing conspiracy theories might make you a criminal: study
By Rob Bailey-Millado

February 26, 2019 | 3:38pm


Composite: Shutterstock

Go figure: If you’re a birther or a 9/11 denier, chances are you aren’t much fun to be around. Sure, we’ve been saying this about our wack-job uncle for years — but now it’s backed up by science.

People who buy into outrageous conspiracy theories — say, that no human has ever walked on the moon or the ancient pyramids were built by aliens — are more inclined to actively engage in anti-social behavior.

That’s the main finding of a team of psychologists from the UK’s Staffordshire University and the University of Kent, who investigated the wider impact these paranoia-fueled fringe beliefs can have on behavior.

“Our research has shown for the first time the role that conspiracy theories can play in determining an individual’s attitude to everyday crime,” study co-author and Kent professor Karen Douglas said in a statement. “It demonstrates that people subscribing to the view that others have conspired might be more inclined toward unethical actions.”

With contemporary conspiracy theories targeting everything from myths surrounding the Mueller report to the chilling “secret” behind Disney’s “Frozen,” this cultural phenomenon is certainly ripe for clinical exploration.

As such, the new study measured participants’ “belief in general notions of conspiracy” as well as how much they agreed with specific theories (“There was an official campaign by MI6 to assassinate Princess Diana”). Those inclined to believe the theories were “more accepting of everyday crime,” such as demanding a refund for no appropriate reason.

In addition, exposure to conspiracy theories was found to make people more apt to engage in low-level criminal activity. Researchers found that this tendency was “directly linked to an individual’s feeling of a lack of social cohesion or shared values, known as anomie.”

For the non-psycholinguists out there, anomie is defined as “the lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.”

Or, as co-author Dan Jolley of Staffordshire put it, “People believing in conspiracy theories are more likely to be accepting of everyday crime, while exposure to theories increases a feeling of anomie, which in turn predicts increased future everyday crime intentions.”
We are now hurtling towards a society where anybody who dares question the official narrative is classed as a domestic terrorist and will be dealt with accordingly.

The reality of the situation is though, anybody who actually believes the official narrative of 9/11 has fallen for the conspiracy theory. That's the paradigm which has now been created.
 






Lurking009

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Thought Control 101, proudly brought to you by the Liberal Left. Thinking is dangerous. Questioning is criminal. Disagreeing with 'them' is the most heinous crime you can commit - a hate crime, in fact. VOTE THEM OUT... or this is your future and your children's future.
 






Karlysymon

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Mar 18, 2017
Messages
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....just found this in the New York Post.... I disagree profoundly with the study conclusion.
Between the lines, I gather that the conclusion is something like: "those who believe in conspiracies are not simply misguided fools..... but actually more likely to embrace/approve of criminality.....and may even be criminals themselves"...
It's isn't enough to disrupt discussions and drive those who challenge TPTB narratives to the margins of society.... we have to criminalize their thoughts and beliefs....
Throwing it out there for all to see


Believing conspiracy theories might make you a criminal: study
By Rob Bailey-Millado

February 26, 2019 | 3:38pm


Composite: Shutterstock

Go figure: If you’re a birther or a 9/11 denier, chances are you aren’t much fun to be around. Sure, we’ve been saying this about our wack-job uncle for years — but now it’s backed up by science.

People who buy into outrageous conspiracy theories — say, that no human has ever walked on the moon or the ancient pyramids were built by aliens — are more inclined to actively engage in anti-social behavior.

That’s the main finding of a team of psychologists from the UK’s Staffordshire University and the University of Kent, who investigated the wider impact these paranoia-fueled fringe beliefs can have on behavior.

“Our research has shown for the first time the role that conspiracy theories can play in determining an individual’s attitude to everyday crime,” study co-author and Kent professor Karen Douglas said in a statement. “It demonstrates that people subscribing to the view that others have conspired might be more inclined toward unethical actions.”

With contemporary conspiracy theories targeting everything from myths surrounding the Mueller report to the chilling “secret” behind Disney’s “Frozen,” this cultural phenomenon is certainly ripe for clinical exploration.

As such, the new study measured participants’ “belief in general notions of conspiracy” as well as how much they agreed with specific theories (“There was an official campaign by MI6 to assassinate Princess Diana”). Those inclined to believe the theories were “more accepting of everyday crime,” such as demanding a refund for no appropriate reason.

In addition, exposure to conspiracy theories was found to make people more apt to engage in low-level criminal activity. Researchers found that this tendency was “directly linked to an individual’s feeling of a lack of social cohesion or shared values, known as anomie.”

For the non-psycholinguists out there, anomie is defined as “the lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group.”

Or, as co-author Dan Jolley of Staffordshire put it, “People believing in conspiracy theories are more likely to be accepting of everyday crime, while exposure to theories increases a feeling of anomie, which in turn predicts increased future everyday crime intentions.”
Well, there is now such a thing as Oppositional Defiant Disorder, that classifies questioning authority as a mental disorder and i can guaranteee that since its in the DSM, Big Pharma is actively working on "cure" for all those who question the official narrative. I first read about it HERE. Freewill give us the ability to question and doubt, only automatons (lacking freewill) don't question authority because they can't.

I'll post a video in @Awoken2's thread where the narrator says that this symbolism is saturated in everything that we see and simultaneously we are asked not to think or talk about it. My belief is that those who will aid the criminalization and eventual incarceration are the alt-media shills (intelligence operatives) who collect vast amounts of data on their readers and send it back to their overlords. This all criminalization of thought/thought control.
 






Lurking009

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Messages
1,274
Well, there is now such a thing as Oppositional Defiant Disorder, that classifies questioning authority as a mental disorder and i can guaranteee that since its in the DSM, Big Pharma is actively working on "cure" for all those who question the official narrative. I first read about it HERE. Freewill give us the ability to question and doubt, only automatons (lacking freewill) don't question authority because they can't.

I'll post a video in @Awoken2's thread where the narrator says that this symbolism is saturated in everything that we see and simultaneously we are asked not to think or talk about it. My belief is that those who will aid the criminalization and eventual incarceration are the alt-media shills (intelligence operatives) who collect vast amounts of data on their readers and send it back to their overlords. This all criminalization of thought/thought control.
This stuff is truly 1984 scary and surreal. It's hard to wrap one's head around the depths of evil.
 






Karlysymon

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Messages
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This is an aside. I’m seeing a lot of people coming against non-vaxers, kind of a shaming of sorts, on social media. I’m seeing it in the light of what you are saying: they are considered non-compliant. There is just an understood out there that we must all trust the medical professionals. On my end, we did vaccinate but opted out of like 1 I think, so I don’t consider myself a non-vaxer but I am a regretful vaxer. I wish I had thought through it all more. My point is that I’m seeing this play out in that realm right now.
That was like 7yrs ago, so its obvious it was included in the dsm version of the time in anticipation of whatever they were to implement 7-10yrs down the line. So yes, it can be liberally applied to anti-vaxxers, rather as one of the reasons it was included in the first place.
 






Legend

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Feb 15, 2019
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Consiracy theories are sinister. I would agree that it could spark a feeble minded person to promote terrorism. Believe it or not, websites like these is the start of that behavior.
 






Etagloc

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Mar 26, 2017
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Thought Control 101, proudly brought to you by the Liberal Left. Thinking is dangerous. Questioning is criminal. Disagreeing with 'them' is the most heinous crime you can commit - a hate crime, in fact. VOTE THEM OUT... or this is your future and your children's future.
There is no "or" about it. This is the future.
 






Joined
Jul 28, 2017
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This was on the radio yesterday in Belgium, too. It’s a pretty hot topic over here too these days, since we have no government at the moment. (Yes this happens quite often ) A lot of ‘fake news’ happens around the upcoming elections, which will be held end of May.
 






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