Comparing Christianity and Islam

Bacsi

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#1
To my surprise I see mostly Christian and Muslim posters here, with a smaller number of people with other worldviews. I'm a Shamanist myself. I do believe in a God, whom we call the Great Spirit. My faith is more of practice than anything, it's not dogmatic.

Anyways. I'd like to share some observations about Christianity and Islam and would like to hear your opinions.

I think, in today's world, Islam is a much more dynamic religion than Christianity. Christianity has had its high time and is on a decline. I believe the Western world will one day become Muslim.

Christianity is very strong on personal morality. Jesus Christ has given most powerful commandments about how to treat your neighbours. Christianity is focused on personal salvation and is extremely fractured socially and ideologically. Islam is very strong on social rules and is much more unified, united and universal than Christianity. It creates a cohesive community. Over the long run, this makes Islam much more viable religion, I think. It's easier to break straws one by one than a whole stack of them. Christianity today is mostly superficial, but Muslims' faith is deep and sincere. Christians are mostly believers in the god of humanism and science, whereas Muslims still do adhere to Islam.

This is all purely my personal opinions. Please don't take them very seriously. Please share your views or point out where you agree or disagree with me. I'll appreciate different opinions and am open to change mine.
 





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#3
You post some interesting contentions. But why would you leave out the other party in the monotheistic trilogy, Judaism? Certainly its adherents, weather merely culturally/socially active or fully religious, play their part in this equation dont they? I agree with some of your post. However in order to simplify my response, this is the most accurate yet concise general comparison of the three faiths I can offer:
Judaism - The first of the monotheistic religious lineage, brought about by Abraham (whom all 3 of these faiths recognize in one capacity or another). They have become focused almost solely on Jewish based/influenced law and its manmade (Talmudic) interpretations and implementation of scriptural law at the expense of their religions faith-based component. They are extremely self-fractured and sect driven.
Christianity - The other side of the coin.... Much of the original knowledge of the faith has been cast aside and as a result, they have suffered primarily in their implementation and adherence to their laws. Whereas modern Judaism has allowed their desire to focus on rabbinical law at the expense of their faith, modern Christianity has eschewed adherence to their system of religious law and moral code, many in clear violation of Jesus' own life and teachings, and instead focused on strengthening their faith at the expense of their religious law responsibilities.
Islam - Islam is meant to be a bridge between the two, a moderate acquiescence to the balance required for a healthy society. We are supposed to take the middle road when possible and have our secular, world perspective and actions guided by both faith and law and avoid extremism. However, to quote Tony Montanas former boss Frank Lopez.... "as you can see, not everyone plays by the rules though."

An interesting topic, but you might consider changing the provocative title as its possible to lead into pointless arguments and petty dialog instead of the clear and productive communication I think we are all hopeful for here.
 





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#4
To my surprise I see mostly Christian and Muslim posters here, with a smaller number of people with other worldviews. I'm a Shamanist myself. I do believe in a God, whom we call the Great Spirit. My faith is more of practice than anything, it's not dogmatic.

Anyways. I'd like to share some observations about Christianity and Islam and would like to hear your opinions.

I think, in today's world, Islam is a much more dynamic religion than Christianity. Christianity has had its high time and is on a decline. I believe the Western world will one day become Muslim. However, I see Christians on average as possessing a superior personal morality. I'd much prefer my neighbours or business partners to be Christians than Muslims. They are more kind, humane, polite and honest. If I cross a street, I want a Christian driver to be driving on it, as they will more likely stop and let me pass whereas a Muslim can drive by and almost hit me, perhaps honking the horn or cussing my way. Muslims overall come across as being on the aggressive and rude side. My stereotype of a Christian is a thoughtful and friendly person. Of course, these are gross generalizations, as there are all kinds of people in any religion.

Christianity is very strong on personal morality. Jesus Christ has given most powerful commandments about how treat your neighbour. Christianity is focused on personal salvation and is extremely fractured socially and ideologically. Islam is very strong on social rules and is much more unified, united and universal than Christianity. It creates a cohesive community. Over the long run, it makes Islam much more viable religion, I think. It's easier to break straws one by one than a whole stack of them. Christianity today is mostly superficial, but Muslims' faith is deep and sincere. Christians are mostly believers in the god of humanism and science, whereas Muslims still do adhere to Islam.

This is all purely my personal opinions. Please don't take them very seriously. Just share your views or point out where you agree or disagree with me. I'll appreciate different opinions and am open to change mine.
What's your point?
 





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#6
@Bacsi

The problem with Christianity is not that it is untrue, but that many Christians live as though it were, thus their interaction with others and influence on society is hamstrung.

It is interesting to me that you define the value you assign to religions from a utilitarian, anthropocentric point of view.

Under this analysis, you may take a step further and conclude from evolutionary theory that luciferianism is the most fitted to a society that best fits the truth of the world as it is.

You would be wrong of course - religion, if it deals with truth at all should be primarily concerned with establishing a right relationship with God. What flows from this to our fellow man and society should flow out of that relationship.

Luke 10

...Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. 28And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.
 





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#7
I like observing and comparing different ideologies. Do you think Islam is stronger and will win eventually? It's one of my points.
I think that is the wrong question. I believe when it comes to spirituality it is about overcoming the barrage of hurdles placed in one's path and that through trial and error we hope to forge iterations of ourselves that we typically can be proud of. Islam wasn't for me, it didn't align with what I believe God wants for me or Christians in general. I sought and seek to be, to the best of my ability, a temple and a representation of the word of God. Through that it goes beyond some whimsical idea of osmosis but living and breathing His word for the purpose of edifying my fellow man and bringing glory to Him.

I think they are only as strong as their adherents and the majority don't represent the individual. So in my opinion, the question should be does Islam foster a spirituality worthy of Him? I don't think it's answerable.
 





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#8
I think that is the wrong question. I believe when it comes to spirituality it is about overcoming the barrage of hurdles placed in one's path and that through trial and error we hope to forge iterations of ourselves that we typically can be proud of. Islam wasn't for me, it didn't align with what I believe God wants for me or Christians in general. I sought and seek to be, to the best of my ability, a temple and a representation of the word of God. Through that it goes beyond some whimsical idea of osmosis but living and breathing His word for the purpose of edifying my fellow man and bringing glory to Him.

I think they are only as strong as their adherents and the majority don't represent the individual. So in my opinion, the question should be does Islam foster a spirituality worthy of Him? I don't think it's answerable.
"So in my opinion, the question should be does Islam foster a spirituality worthy of Him? I don't think it's answerable."
Id say from my perspective, its pretty clear that all 3 (Judaism, Christianity and Islam) at their core principles are harmonious and all 3 are paths which allow humans to flourish via monotheistic worship and adherence to scriptural laws where they are legal and applicable in modern times. Maybe Im more idealistic than some on here, but I think all 3 are valid. It just depends on how willing the follower is to implement their tenants in our actual lives.
 





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#9
"So in my opinion, the question should be does Islam foster a spirituality worthy of Him? I don't think it's answerable."
Id say from my perspective, its pretty clear that all 3 (Judaism, Christianity and Islam) at their core principles are harmonious and all 3 are paths which allows humans to flourish via monotheistic worship and adherence to scriptural laws where they are legal and applicable in modern times. Maybe Im more idealistic than some on here, but I think all 3 are valid. It just depends on how willing the follower is to implement their tenants in our actual lives.
Eh I differ but I'm not a holy roller out to scare people from fire and eternal damnation. I do agree that it depends on willingness but I often see cultural adherents that through birth or societal norms adhere but I think that is just common in general looking at the history of Israel and Christian communities that didn't get massacred. To get back to where I differ I would it stems from the verse below. There is, in my opinion, only one way but I'm not disgruntled by others choosing their own ways.

Matthew 7:14 KJV
Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
 





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#10
Eh I differ but I'm not a holy roller out to scare people from fire and eternal damnation. I do agree that it depends on willingness but I often see cultural adherents that through birth or societal norms adhere but I think that is just common in general looking at the history of Israel and Christian communities that didn't get massacred. To get back to where I differ I would it stems from the verse below. There is, in my opinion, only one way but I'm not disgruntled by others choosing their own ways.

Matthew 7:14 KJV
Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
There are similar notations in Islam as well. Perhaps someone more educated on the subject can enlighten us all but I think there is a hadeeth which basically states "Heaven is surrounded by the hardships of the world, but if people could see it, they would do anything to get there. While hell is surrounded by the pleasures of the world and this temporary life, but if humans could see it, they would do anything to avoid it."
 





Bacsi

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#13
You post some interesting contentions. But why would you leave out the other party in the monotheistic trilogy, Judaism? Certainly its adherents, weather merely culturally/socially active or fully religious, play their part in this equation dont they? I agree with some of your post. However in order to simplify my response, this is the most accurate yet concise general comparison of the three faiths I can offer:
Judaism - The first of the monotheistic religious lineage, brought about by Abraham (whom all 3 of these faiths recognize in one capacity or another). They have become focused almost solely on Jewish based/influenced law and its manmade (Talmudic) interpretations and implementation of scriptural law at the expense of their religions faith-based component. They are extremely self-fractured and sect driven.
Christianity - The other side of the coin.... Much of the original knowledge of the faith has been cast aside and as a result, they have suffered primarily in their implementation and adherence to their laws. Whereas modern Judaism has allowed their desire to focus on rabbinical law at the expense of their faith, modern Christianity has eschewed adherence to their system of religious law and moral code, many in clear violation of Jesus' own life and teachings, and instead focused on strengthening their faith at the expense of their religious law responsibilities.
Islam - Islam is meant to be a bridge between the two, a moderate acquiescence to the balance required for a healthy society. We are supposed to take the middle road when possible and have our secular, world perspective and actions guided by both faith and law and avoid extremism. However, to quote Tony Montanas former boss Frank Lopez.... "as you can see, not everyone plays by the rules though."

An interesting topic, but you might consider changing the provocative title as its possible to lead into pointless arguments and petty dialog instead of the clear and productive communication I think we are all hopeful for here.
Very interesting outlook, thank you for sharing. I compare Christianity and Islam as the two truly global religions today. They've influenced the history of humanity more than any other religions. You mention healthy society as the result of the practice of Islam. Surely, some tenets are good or very good. I especially respect proclaiming the banking interest as evil. This is a huge value of Islam in my eyes, as banking interest has been used as the main tool in enslaving individuals and nations by the masonic rulers of the planet.
 





Bacsi

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#14
@Bacsi

The problem with Christianity is not that it is untrue, but that many Christians live as though it were, thus their interaction with others and influence on society is hamstrung.

It is interesting to me that you define the value you assign to religions from a utilitarian, anthropocentric point of view.

Under this analysis, you may take a step further and conclude from evolutionary theory that luciferianism is the most fitted to a society that best fits the truth of the world as it is.

You would be wrong of course - religion, if it deals with truth at all should be primarily concerned with establishing a right relationship with God. What flows from this to our fellow man and society should flow out of that relationship.

Luke 10

...Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. 28And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.
Luciferianism expressed in Freemasonry seems to be the religion of those who rule the world. I don't think it's a good religion at all. There is no truth known to man. Simply because of the way we perceive the world and due to our limitations. Therefore, the only good is to build a good moral and sustainable society and to achieve better understanding of ourselves and the world around us. I don't think any religions are doing a great job today at achieving this goal, because they appeared in the age when humanity was fractured in isolated pockets geographically. I've looked at Scientology, and it seems to overcome some of the problems of the old-age religions by being a more global and unifying ideology, but it goes way out of wack with the mind control and alien mythology etc.
 





Bacsi

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#15
I think that is the wrong question. I believe when it comes to spirituality it is about overcoming the barrage of hurdles placed in one's path and that through trial and error we hope to forge iterations of ourselves that we typically can be proud of. Islam wasn't for me, it didn't align with what I believe God wants for me or Christians in general. I sought and seek to be, to the best of my ability, a temple and a representation of the word of God. Through that it goes beyond some whimsical idea of osmosis but living and breathing His word for the purpose of edifying my fellow man and bringing glory to Him.

I think they are only as strong as their adherents and the majority don't represent the individual. So in my opinion, the question should be does Islam foster a spirituality worthy of Him? I don't think it's answerable.
I agree very much that the majority don't represent the individual, however, there's a more generalized result of any ideology and we can try and look at that, even though we know that there's a huge fluctuation between individuals. What I'm looking at and what I'm interested it is where religions or non-religious ideologies lead people eventually through their ideas. Whatever the worldview is, I think, the main question is "What it causes people to do?" You talk about personal sainctification or self-improvement, if I understood you correctly. So you're more interested in the internal aspect? It's very interesting, too. Because it helps humans to dig deeper into the spiritual or the unknown. However, if in the process of doing this the outside world, the society is suffering, do you think it's moral to keep worrying only about your personal quest and progress? Aren't individual and social inter-related?
 





Bacsi

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#16
"So in my opinion, the question should be does Islam foster a spirituality worthy of Him? I don't think it's answerable."
Id say from my perspective, its pretty clear that all 3 (Judaism, Christianity and Islam) at their core principles are harmonious and all 3 are paths which allow humans to flourish via monotheistic worship and adherence to scriptural laws where they are legal and applicable in modern times. Maybe Im more idealistic than some on here, but I think all 3 are valid. It just depends on how willing the follower is to implement their tenants in our actual lives.
I think Christians today have lost much of their true faith, due to the fact that through education and technical progress, Christians worship atheism and humanism in the actual fact. Christianity has in reality been pushed into a small margin of Sunday morning service and Christian sub-culture as a social club, nothing more. I see Islam mostly has not lost its power to inspire deep and sincere faith. This is my personal impression. I have my own theory about why this has happened.
 





Bacsi

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#17
Eh I differ but I'm not a holy roller out to scare people from fire and eternal damnation. I do agree that it depends on willingness but I often see cultural adherents that through birth or societal norms adhere but I think that is just common in general looking at the history of Israel and Christian communities that didn't get massacred. To get back to where I differ I would it stems from the verse below. There is, in my opinion, only one way but I'm not disgruntled by others choosing their own ways.

Matthew 7:14 KJV
Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
I understand. My problem with such view is simple. If this only true way has been revealed at some point of time (let's say, in year 33 A.D.) and has been known only since then, what about all the people before this true way was revealed? How about all the people who have never heard about the true way even after year 33 A.D. around the world until today? No hope? So I see such ideology as very very limiting and not co-inciding with the true nature of all-loving God.
 





Bacsi

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#18
There are similar notations in Islam as well. Perhaps someone more educated on the subject can enlighten us all but I think there is a hadeeth which basically states "Heaven is surrounded by the hardships of the world, but if people could see it, they would do anything to get there. While hell is surrounded by the pleasures of the world and this temporary life, but if humans could see it, they would do anything to avoid it."
What you state is that works determine heaven or hell. I see this as a much more coherent and true idea than just "believe in the truth and be saved". However, in Islam as well I see many people who make the gates of heaven too narrow and reserved to Muslims only and sometimes, to the right kind of Muslims and noone else. Pls see my previous post above on such limiting ideas.
 





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#19
see my sig.
the end.
no need for nonsense arguments and ego games. most the christians and muslims are wrong about the other religion.
the dawah and missionary people usually argue but miss the whole point.